Do we interfere/worry too much these days?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by HollyWoozle, Sep 18, 2018.

  1. roosterhavoc

    roosterhavoc Free Ranging

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    Hens will kill chicks occasionally for some unknown reason. I usually kill the hen too. I’ve only had it happen twice. A hen on a nest should be protected from predators. That part should be a non issue.
    I’d say for eating birds incubators are far better but for a backyard flock just to have, hen raised is superior.
     
  2. roosterhavoc

    roosterhavoc Free Ranging

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    I think too many people keep chickens confined for themselves instead of the chickens. They are so worried about losing one or a couple birds to a fox or something that they keep them closed up 24/7.
    If you put chickens in your yard you can bet sooner or later something will try to eat them. In most states it’s legal to trap and kill predators killing chickens.
    I can’t for the life of me understand why a chicken owner would just opt to lock them away instead of free ranging at least some of the time.
    People can manage to find their way onto a forum but can’t figure out how to trap a raccoon? Some of this is crazy.
     
  3. BlueBaby

    BlueBaby Enabler

    I agree with you about the week critters. More people need to be watching out for those thing's and not passing the bad genetics down the line. I do a lot of batches of hatching chicks from my flock, and if I were to see a defect in one of the chicks, it will be culled right off the bat.
     
  4. BlueBaby

    BlueBaby Enabler

    I don't let mine free-range at all except for my extra roosters. About a year and a half ago, 3 loose dog's got into one of my next door neighbors yard. They killed 28 hen's, and 6 two-month old chicks. You could see where the dog's had been eating some of them! The only survivors there were 2 rooster's that they had penned up where the dog's couldn't get to them!
     
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  5. roosterhavoc

    roosterhavoc Free Ranging

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    That’s a people problem not a chicken issue. Of course if you have dogs running loose I wouldn’t let the birds out. There’s no way I would keep my chickens penned up completely because of somebody’s dogs though. I would deal with that before hand.
     
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  6. BlueBaby

    BlueBaby Enabler

    It was dealt with. The 3 dog's are dead.
     
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  7. roosterhavoc

    roosterhavoc Free Ranging

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    Everybody’s situation is totally different. I understand that not everyone has a big enough yard to even make it worthwhile to free range. Others have firearm discharge restrictions, close neighbors etc.. I’m talking about people who clearly live rural and have raccoon, fox, coyote issues yet refuse to do anything about it. They say well the animals were there first so I’ll just keep them penned all the time. That’s no life for a chicken. That’s how they all get sick, pecked etc.. I’m not really trying to convince anyone but it’s no wonder so many have chicken health problems.
     
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  8. roosterhavoc

    roosterhavoc Free Ranging

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    There ya go let the birds out then lol
     
  9. SeramaMamma

    SeramaMamma Songster

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    That's a people problem. Mean birds shouldn't be bred, period. I don't need saddles and I also keep them in pairs, but that's very common in seramas, they don't wear their hens out.

    I've said it once and I'll say it again- temperament is genetic.
     
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  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    A lot of 'chicken problems' are actually 'people problems'. :lol:

    Well, it can depend on the pen/run and the population numbers.
     

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