Does anyone know the ratio of amprolium (corid) to water for day old chicks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by jbaliberti, Oct 7, 2014.

  1. jbaliberti

    jbaliberti Out Of The Brooder

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    I have been doing a lot of research on here and different sites and I have decided to do a 5 day cycle of amprolium on my new chicks instead of giving them medicated feed. The only problem is, well i think its a problem I'm not really sure. The only amprolium my local store had was Corid (which they said was for calves, but would work for poultry as long as the dose was right). They didn't know what the dose was though. So my question is does anyone know what the does for the 5 day treatment would be and has anyone taken this route before? If anyone has done this what are the pros and cons to doing it this way over the medicated feed. Just a little backround the reason I chose not to use the medicated feed was because I was told that the medicated feed is a waste because there isn't enough medication in the feed and I would be better doing the 5 day cycle or nothing. I am new to raising chicks and want to make the correct responsible decision since these animals will be producing food for my family.
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    You may get other advice but here's my thoughts.
    I wouldn't give amprolium to baby chicks. If they hot in the brooder and get thirsty they'll drink too much and it can kill them. Amprolium causes vitamin deficiency, another thing I don't want in baby chicks.
    I would keep the corid on hand for any occurrence of coccidiosis that appears.
    I never use medicated feed. If you keep the bedding bone dry and feeders at least half full you shouldn't have any issues. Coccidia need moisture to continue their life cycle. Keeping feed in the feeders limits chicks picking in the litter.
    You're right in that the dose in the medicated is too low to cure an outbreak.
    All chickens will be exposed to coccidia throughout their lives and the sooner they develop resistance the better.
    There's evidence that those on medicated feed never develop good resistance.
     
  3. dheltzel

    dheltzel Overrun With Chickens

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    I respectfully disagree, I always use medicated feed. The dosage is intentionally low in the feed to suppress, but not eliminate the protozoa that cause Coccisdosis. It is not an antibiotic and causes no problems for any bird, even in higher than recommended dosages (I'm sure you could take that to an extreme and find damage).

    By feeding medicated feed, you are stacking the deck in favor of the chicks building up an immunity before they get sick. Keeping extremely clean and dry conditions can also do that, and you can certainly do both.

    Medicated feed is not a guarantee, I still lose a some young birds on occasion, but I believe it is a lot less of a problem because I use the medicated feed.

    As for the dosage of Corid, search on this site for a lot more info than I can reproduce here. It depends if you have the liquid or powder and how severe the symptoms are. If I spot a chick with Coccidosis, I give them a small amount of the liquid orally (usually about a ml, depending on the size of the chick. If I catch it in time, it is very effective. I also add it to the water of the entire group afterward, and that is in addition to the levels in the feed. I have never heard of a chicken that died from an Amprolium overdose, but certainly many have died for lack of enough.
     
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    That's cool. We each have our own management techniques and concerns. To each his own.
    I raise at least 200 chicks a year and have never used medicated feed. I keep Corid on hand but have only had to dose an adult flock once, never chicks.
    I give chicks lots of space and free range as early as possible. I have never lost a chick to coccidiosis.
    I also start chicks either with adult hens or if artificially brooded, I get probiotics in them right out of the brooder, just like a hen does.
    If one keeps their chicks closely confined on the ground or on bedding and isn't extremely careful, they probably should use medicated.
     
  5. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I'm not sure what good giving Corid to day old chicks would do? Isn't it supposed to suppress current infestations, and day old chicks, especially in a brooder, shouldn't have exposure unless it's intentional. I'm missing your rationale here.

    I've used it for treatment of an apparent problem, but can never remember the dosage so just do a search on the site.
     
  6. jbaliberti

    jbaliberti Out Of The Brooder

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    Donrae....I was asking because on the Corid it states there are two ways to give the medication either in a preventative 5 day cycle or a 21 day treatment cycle. I guess I should have put that in the intial post. Anyway, this is my first time raising chicks and I just want to make the correct decision and it looks like probiotics and clean dry bedding are the way to go. No offense to those on medicated feed it is such a hard decision to make. well my on my way to pick up my chicks thank you everyone for input
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Most chicks don't get cocci until the second or third week of life.They need a little gradual exposure to the coccidia organism to build up natural immunity to it. Keeping things dry in the brooder is a must. At the time they get put on the ground,is the time many people will see symptoms of coccidiosis, because the chick is suddenly exposed to a lot of it at once. I like to put a piece of sod in my brooder early on to expose them to a small amount of cocci, so they can build up immunity gradually. Chicks raised on the ground from day one by a broody hen don't seem to get it because of that.
    I used medicated feed with my first chicks, but stopped, and I've never had a case of cocci in 4 years of raising chicks. I would keep Corid on the shelf just in case, but I wouldn't treat them preventatively unless I had an outbreak earlier.
    The treatment dosage of Corid is 2 tsp of the liquid, or 1.5 tsp of the powder per gallon of water for 5-7 days.
    The preventative dosage is 3/4 tsp of the liquid, or 1/2 tsp of the powder per gallon for 7 days, and off 2 weeks, then back on for 7 days, and off 2 weeks, etc. Everyone does it a little differently since there is no official dosage for chickens because it is a cattle medicine.
    Personally, I don't like to give medicines if at all possible, even though Corid is pretty safe.
     
  8. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    If you want to give it as a preventative, I'd wait until they're older. I know folks here say their bitty brooder babies get symptoms of cocci, but for the life of me I can never figure where it's coming from. I'm talking folks with no other birds, who brood in the house, no exposure to the outside. I just don't see it....if anyone can explain, I'd love to learn.

    Cocci seems to be the worst around the 6-10 week period, so were I to go a preventative route I'd time it around 4 weeks. Then again, I'm also big fan of the natural exposure and allowing them to build up a tolerance. I'm not sure if the label use as a preventive is for poultry, or just cattle?
     
  9. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    I couldn't have said it better.
     
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