Does blood in poop always signify cocci?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chickenheart, Jun 14, 2009.

  1. chickenheart

    chickenheart In the Brooder

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    The poop of one of my 5-week old chicks had a small amount of blood in it. Her behavior is absolutely normal (and, as these are my first ever chicks, I have spent a lot of time with them and have gotten to know their "characters"). She was my little runty, but has really feathered and is flying up to roosts some of the others won't attempt. TSC here doesn't carry corid or sulmet, and feed stores are closed till morning. I read in the forum that when you see blood in the poop, the chick only has a few days. If she is not exhibiting other symptoms, can I wait to start her on something in the morning of should I be trying to find another source tonight? Thanks for any help!
     
  2. annek

    annek Songster

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    First of all let me say that I have never had this with my chicks so I may not be correct. When I have read about this it always talks about the feathers being ruffled, lethargic, then comes the bloody poop and when that shows up it can be too late. It doesn't sound like you have any of the other symptoms so it may be something else. You may want to post a picture, you don't want to treat for it if it is not a problem. Do you have the chicks on medicated feed? Do they go outside? Do you have other birds?
     
  3. chickenheart

    chickenheart In the Brooder

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    I have eight chicks that are still in a brooder. I expanded the brooder a week and a half ago and they still have plenty of space. They all seem happy and healthy. I have not seen blood in the poop of any others. I can't post a "poop pic" because she walked in it, but it was a swirl of red in the white part of her poop. I've been so excited because my coop is finished and I was going to move them out today, but it has been storming so I'm holding out for tomorrow. I don't want it to be any scarier for them than necessary. So if I'm not observing lethargy and ruffling, I should relax? These are my first chicks (and this has been my first BYC post) and I'm just trying to do the best I can for them. Oh, they are on non-medicated organic feed. ACV in their water and a spoonful of yoghurt each day.
     
  4. Zoey

    Zoey In the Brooder

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    I would assume it IS cocci as thay are NOT on medicated feed.

    Could it have eaten a staple/other hardware ?

    I've raised hundreds of chicks and hve only seen bloody droppings 3 times, and all times it was cocci, also if the droppings are foamy yellow, this also indicates cocci...
     
  5. LA~Poulet

    LA~Poulet Songster

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    Was it perhaps discarded intestinal lining?
     
  6. chickenheart

    chickenheart In the Brooder

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    There didn't seem to be any fleshy material in the poop to make me think it was lining. There's no way it was a staple. The brooder is made of huge sheets of cardboard that had never been stapled, and then I taped them together. I just checked on the girls again- I was hoping to see Cherry (the chick I'm talking about) poop, but no go. I'm wondering about the others. Their poop is pretty much a solid, brownish color so I'm not seeing anything, but I'm beginning to think it has a different smell about it and that has me concerned. Still, everyone is active and busy. Thanks so much for your responses!
     
  7. annek

    annek Songster

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    If the chick is acting fine and the poop only had a swirl of red in it, it may not even be blood. Have you looked at the famous poop page? Take a look at this and see if it looks like your chicks, then relax, I don't think you have a problem.

    Forgot to post the link:

    http://www.chat.allotment.org.uk/index.php?topic=17568.0
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2009
  8. threehorses

    threehorses Songster

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    Technically, blood in feces can be from cocci, bacterial enteritis, or other causes. However, most often it's from cocci - especialy in babies, and almost always in babies on non-medicated food. Cocci are difficult to diagnose, even in a vet lab, so we treat based on that symptom. Many people use Corid because it's gentle on gut bacteria and deadly to the protazoal cocci that cause coccidiosis. In older birds, I use Sulmet or any time I highly suspect E. coli in younger birds.

    In your case, I'd treat with Corid or Sulmet in the morning. Tonight I'd start her on a probiotic and continue that throughout her treatment. Then after treatment, you can give every other day for a couple of weeks.

    My rule of thumb is that for every day I treat, I give probiotics for twice that many days afterwards but only evvery other day.

    7 days of antibiotics = 14 days of probiotics given every other day.

    Just a note about organic feeds. They replace the coccidiostatic activity of amprolium of medicated feed by using probiotics, live bacteria, in their feed design. This is great - however - live bacteria don't necessarily always live long in a bagged feed on a shelf in the conditions that we or the stores keep feed. They do better, stay alive longer, in cool conditions. So you won't be getting as much power from the probiotics in the feed as you might want.

    If you choose to do organic, you really should go ahead and give all the babies additional separate probiotics at least weekly for the first six weeks. What you're doing is making SURE that the cocci are held at bay by good bacteria. Medicated feeds are fed for six weeks, but you're replacing that with probiotics. Then if you see any problems, use Corid (in healthy birds).

    In your case, I'd separate the sick bird and a buddy. (They do better with friends.) Treat them with Corid and then give them probiotics as directed above. The rest of the healthy babies I'd simply give probiotics every other day as directed above.

    Clean and disinfect all the feeders/waterers, and replace the bedding once you've removed your ill baby and his friend to the other brooder.

    Probiotic choices: Probios or fastrack from the feedstore, or ask their associates to show you their live-bacteria probiotics in the horse/cattle aisle. Make sure that they at least contain live bacteria (usually shown in CFU's, culture forming units) and not just byproducts of bacteria. TSC has probios in powder and paste. I prefer the powder, and it lasts for a long while in the fridge - and stays alive. You simply woulld sprinkle it on their food at the first feeding in the morning. Or you can mix it into a quickly eaten more wet treat. (Don't use in their water - for any probiotic). You could also buy the paste if it's more economical and use a little dab for each chick.

    Other options: plain yogurt, live culture (dannon, yoplait, etc). 1`heaping teaspoon usually treats 6 chicks.
    Acidophilus capsules or tablets (grocery store, health food store, pharmacy) Crush tablet or break capsule onto feed or into a treat.

    I hope this helps!
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2009
  9. idahodebra

    idahodebra In the Brooder

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    Quote:Thank you for that link! I had been wondering about what I was seeing in my otherwise healthy-acting chicks, and that puts my concerns to rest. I didn't want to treat them unnecessarily, but I didn't want to ignore something either.
     
  10. Zoey

    Zoey In the Brooder

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    If you do suspect Cocci, limit the protein and no vitamins in the water , as cocci thrives on protein, wait at least a week after the antibiotic treatment is finished before you boost the proteins again.
     

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