Donkey vs. Llama for guarding livestock???

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by jkl79, Nov 2, 2008.

  1. jkl79

    jkl79 Out Of The Brooder

    64
    0
    39
    Apr 5, 2008
    Central TX
    I'm new at all this - help!!

    My husband and I recently bought 15 acres that we'll be slowly shaping into a farm. Our first task is to mend fences before purchasing a small flock of goats to help remove the brush and work towards an ag exemption. Being in central TX, we have a major problem with coyote. Everyone seems to have a different opinion about the best type of guard animal - donkey vs. llama. What have your experiences been with this? Also, have you had problems feeding the livestock (goats and sheep) while having the donkey and llama around? Can they all eat the same feed?

    Any advice, stories, insight is greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Chatychick

    Chatychick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 9, 2007
    Blue Mound, Kansas
    Well I have a donkey and wont put him in with my goats as he wants to chase them.Another thing is when they start kidding the donkey will think the new babies are predators. I have heard of many problems with donkeys. Some say its the male donkeys that will do this worse but some have had better luck than others. Dont know wbout Llamas. I have large guard dogs and they seem to bond better with goats. I have Great Pyr/Anatilians with mine and they love the goats.
     
  3. miron28

    miron28 Chillin' With My Peeps

    557
    5
    141
    Sep 8, 2008
    lenoir north carolina
    one of my good friends has two llamas. and a bunch of goats he has never had any problems. i was thinking about getting a couple of goats. i will have to watch this post.
     
  4. JaciesCoop

    JaciesCoop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 16, 2007
    Arizona
    Our neighbor has 20 goats and 3 llamas. They have had no more problems with the coyotes since getting the llamas. But one thing to watch out for. They are going to get the baby boy who is now 6 mos old (llama) fixed because they do get very rowdy and try and mount everything including people!! [​IMG]

    The donkey they had, had to be kept separate from the goats as he chased them all the time.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2008
  5. Pumpkinpup

    Pumpkinpup Poultry Princess

    Jul 16, 2008
    North-West Georgia
    I have several friends with goats and we have tons of coyote's here. Great Pyranese(spelling?) dogs seem to be the favored guardian of goat and sheep flocks here. I have heard about problems with donks as well and know nothing about llamas.
     
  6. zatsdeb

    zatsdeb Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 2, 2007
    Lincoln, Illinois
    I have donkeys and the jack will not be put in with the goats, I have boer and sanaans, but the jenny is fine with them. The dogs seem to make better goat protecters, the great pyrneese I hear are the best, you have to get them as puppies and they have to grow up with the goats and spend 24/7 with them, they will bond with the goats, they are not house dogs anymore!
    our donkeys have complete run of most of the property and I believe they keep predators away, just by the noise they make!!!
    They will kill dogs though. I don't know about baby goats, but I know a jack will kill his own baby donkey if he is in with the jenny when she is having it, or has it.
    keep doing research, and do what is best for you, I don't know anything about llamas except they spit and you don't want to bottle feed one!! they bond with you and then will turn on you. I have read this in several articles. my DH doesn't like them either, he was chased by a llama at someones house.
     
  7. adoptedbyachicken

    adoptedbyachicken Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    One of the guys I work with bought a farm and the llamas came with it, he was told they were there to guard against coyotes so he took their word for it. Well he lost stock really badly as he moved them in and thought it was just their stress, that they would come around and bond. About 5 years later when he is still watching coyotes walk right past these llamas he took them to an auction and got a LGD.

    I have a donkey and he does nothing. Just a cute pet is all. I got him for that reason but he sill only chase a coyote if he wants to play, if he is eating or sleeping he watches them go by. Hubby shot a coyote about 5 yards from him and he never even flinched or went to investigate.

    I have 2 Maremmas protecting my flock and highly recommend them. No issues with feeding them with goats as they are not interested in dog food. With my poultry I have to wait till after dark and the birds are at roost to feed or the dogs don't get anything.
     
  8. jkl79

    jkl79 Out Of The Brooder

    64
    0
    39
    Apr 5, 2008
    Central TX
    Oh no! I had not heard this about llamas. I am leaning towards a llama since I have heard mixed reviews about donkeys, although it seems to be fine if you have a jenny. We are not living on the land yet and will have neighbors check on the goats and guard animal until we're able to move out there (about 6 months).
    What have your experiences been regarding the feeding needs of pasture goats? I know some people do not go out with their stock daily, as long as the animals have constant access to water and good pasture land. Does anyone have feedback about that?

    Thank you so much for your advice everyone! Keep it coming! I'll post more info as I learn more about llamas vs. donkeys.
     
  9. jkl79

    jkl79 Out Of The Brooder

    64
    0
    39
    Apr 5, 2008
    Central TX
    I have never heard of a maremma. What is that? Because I won't be out there daily, I just feel strange leaving a guard dog on the land - I'm sure that's not rational of me - but it's because I'm so used to dogs being pets. I feel like they will require more daily care. Is that correct?
     
  10. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    87
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    My impression is that neither donkeys and llamas usually work especially well as the main or near-sole means of predator protection. The people I know who consider them useful, do so in conjunction with good fences (good-height woven wire, with a couple strands of electric around the outside, hooked to a very peppy charger) and the occasional use of a shotgun &c.

    Pat
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by