Draft Prevention

Crobinson08

In the Brooder
Apr 23, 2020
24
16
46
North Texas
I live in North Texas so cold weather isn't a huge concern most of the time, however, the next few days and going into Jan/Feb we will be looking at possible freezing temps. I want to prevent drafts but also leave plenty of ventilation and I need help in deciding what to cover and what to leave open. The side vents at the top face north/south (the side windows have already been covered in plastic and shutters closed) and the front windows face the west. Roosts are on the far right end of the coop and the side vents/front windows are above their heads when they lay down. Do I cover the side vents to prevent the north winds from blowing through the coop and leave the front windows open for ventilation or vice versa? Sorry for long post but any suggestions are appreciated!
20200628_182336.jpg
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
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5 Years
Jul 3, 2016
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You really might not need to cover anything. Freezing temps don't equal drafts. Windy freezing temps would be more concerning. If the forecast calls for wind driven cold weather, I'd cover just the stuff that faces into primary wind direction. Any of the top hinged panels that you have tied open, you could lower those half way down and that should be good enough to buffer winds (and continue to provide good ventilation) as long as you don't get winds positioned to blow right into the side of them.
 

khind

Songster
7 Years
Jul 16, 2014
355
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Norman, OK, USA
You really might not need to cover anything. Freezing temps don't equal drafts. Windy freezing temps would be more concerning. If the forecast calls for wind driven cold weather, I'd cover just the stuff that faces into primary wind direction. Any of the top hinged panels that you have tied open, you could lower those half way down and that should be good enough to buffer winds (and continue to provide good ventilation) as long as you don't get winds positioned to blow right into the side of them.
Is there a spec for something like number of inches above chickens' combs that ventilating openings such as this should be placed? Or just make sure they're above and not right at them? We're set in Oklahoma this week to experience a part of this polar vortex much of the country will be experiencing, and I'm trying to prepare quickly. And it's usually gusting-windy here.
 

Alaskan

The Frosted Flake
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13 Years
Jul 26, 2008
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Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
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Is there a spec for something like number of inches above chickens' combs that ventilating openings such as this should be placed? Or just make sure they're above and not right at them? We're set in Oklahoma this week to experience a part of this polar vortex much of the country will be experiencing, and I'm trying to prepare quickly. And it's usually gusting-windy here.
If it is super gusting,you might want to figure out how to rig up baffles or louvers to help slow down the wind.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Nov 27, 2012
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SW Michigan
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Is there a spec for something like number of inches above chickens' combs that ventilating openings such as this should be placed? Or just make sure they're above and not right at them?
As high as possible.
Post some pics of coop, inside and out, and we can help you figure it out.


If it is super gusting,you might want to figure out how to rig up baffles or louvers to help slow down the wind.
Yes, I have a couple different baffles.
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/ventilation-baffling.75434/
 

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