Ducks keeping her head down to her chest

Lil_ducky

Hatching
Dec 2, 2020
11
5
8
My papals dog recently grabbed my female duck up by her neck. She's a small mallard duck. Since then she's been keeping her head down to her chest and won't quack at all. Usually when I quack for them they come running and she will start quaking very loudly but she won't. She's barely eating or drinking and I'm really starting to worry. Please help
 

Isaac 0

Enabler
5 Years
Jul 19, 2016
24,258
99,072
1,331
Iowa
Are you able to see any injuries on her neck?

Could you post a few pictures of the duck?

How long has she not been eating, or drinking? Is she producing poops?
 

Lil_ducky

Hatching
Dec 2, 2020
11
5
8
Are you able to see any injuries on her neck?

Could you post a few pictures of the duck?

How long has she not been eating, or drinking? Is she producing poops?
I can't see any injuries but I'll post pics of her when I get home. And it's been about 2 days. She's been pooping.
 

Isaac 0

Enabler
5 Years
Jul 19, 2016
24,258
99,072
1,331
Iowa
I can't see any injuries but I'll post pics of her when I get home. And it's been about 2 days. She's been pooping.

If you gently, try to pry her neck up, is she able to show any muscle movement in it, or does it just droop back down?

Can you readily get supplies from a feed store, and/ or pharmacy in your area?
 

Lil_ducky

Hatching
Dec 2, 2020
11
5
8
If you gently, try to pry her neck up, is she able to show any muscle movement in it, or does it just droop back down?

Can you readily get supplies from a feed store, and/ or pharmacy in your area?
I haven't tried to touch her neck cause I've been scared I'd hurt her and idk. Theres a feeders supplies a bit away from my home
 

Isaac 0

Enabler
5 Years
Jul 19, 2016
24,258
99,072
1,331
Iowa
I haven't tried to touch her neck cause I've been scared I'd hurt her and idk. Theres a feeders supplies a bit away from my home

Dogs have very powerful bites, so the idea that there is muscle damage in the neck, directly due to the dog, sounds most probable. Generally speaking, with birds the first goal is addressing hydration and nutritional needs and correcting any concerns with their body temperature.

If you have noted your bird is not eating much, it's likely she has a lowered body temperature and is having a hard time maintaining warmth. Externally, that can be seen by her having a hunched over-look. Since sick birds tend to suffer from hypothermia easily, it would be a good idea to bring her inside, and set her in a warm, dimly area, with feed and water provided. If she is having a hard time keeping her neck up, it would be best if you add marbles, or rocks into the waterer to prevent any chance of aspiration, or drowning.

To help prevent further dehydration, you can try dripping sugar water along her bill (keeping her neck upright), but it's unlikely you will be able to get the number of fluids she needs just by simply dripping it against her bill.

Preferably with severely dehydrated birds, you give them fluids IV, SQ, or IO, but administering birds at home in such a route is impractical for most new/inexperienced owners. A simpler, fairly effective way to give fluids is by crop feeding, where you pass a tube through the birds esophagus into their crop. Information on tube feeding can be found on the links below, and only requires a few supplies, including parrot baby feeding formula, 60ml syringe, gram scale, and a red rubber catheter to administer with. It is sad, but often true that most of these sick/injured birds die because of dehydration, before anything else.

https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/tube-feeding-ducks-updated-5-7-2020.1211994/

https://www.backyardchickens.com/th...ng-guide-pictures-under-construction.1064392/

Take a look at the links above, and try to work on getting some of those supplies as soon as you can. If you see any puncture wounds on the neck area, antibiotics may be a good idea. Enrofloxacin, Cephalexin, and Clindamycin are some antibiotics that can be obtained online without an RX, and have good coverage.

https://allbirdproducts.com/products/baytril-10

Of course, a vet tends to be the best route to take, so if you live near one, that would be best.
 

Lil_ducky

Hatching
Dec 2, 2020
11
5
8
Dogs have very powerful bites, so the idea that there is muscle damage in the neck, directly due to the dog, sounds most probable. Generally speaking, with birds the first goal is addressing hydration and nutritional needs and correcting any concerns with their body temperature.

If you have noted your bird is not eating much, it's likely she has a lowered body temperature and is having a hard time maintaining warmth. Externally, that can be seen by her having a hunched over-look. Since sick birds tend to suffer from hypothermia easily, it would be a good idea to bring her inside, and set her in a warm, dimly area, with feed and water provided. If she is having a hard time keeping her neck up, it would be best if you add marbles, or rocks into the waterer to prevent any chance of aspiration, or drowning.

To help prevent further dehydration, you can try dripping sugar water along her bill (keeping her neck upright), but it's unlikely you will be able to get the number of fluids she needs just by simply dripping it against her bill.

Preferably with severely dehydrated birds, you give them fluids IV, SQ, or IO, but administering birds at home in such a route is impractical for most new/inexperienced owners. A simpler, fairly effective way to give fluids is by crop feeding, where you pass a tube through the birds esophagus into their crop. Information on tube feeding can be found on the links below, and only requires a few supplies, including parrot baby feeding formula, 60ml syringe, gram scale, and a red rubber catheter to administer with. It is sad, but often true that most of these sick/injured birds die because of dehydration, before anything else.

https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/tube-feeding-ducks-updated-5-7-2020.1211994/

https://www.backyardchickens.com/th...ng-guide-pictures-under-construction.1064392/

Take a look at the links above, and try to work on getting some of those supplies as soon as you can. If you see any puncture wounds on the neck area, antibiotics may be a good idea. Enrofloxacin, Cephalexin, and Clindamycin are some antibiotics that can be obtained online without an RX, and have good coverage.

https://allbirdproducts.com/products/baytril-10

Of course, a vet tends to be the best route to take, so if you live near one, that would be best.
Thank you so much I really appreciate your help. Thank you
 

Lil_ducky

Hatching
Dec 2, 2020
11
5
8

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