E Coli and klebsiella positive????

berkchicks

Songster
Jun 29, 2018
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Maryland
Hey guys super long story and you may have seen some of my post this past week but in the span of 7 days I have lost 3 chickens since first showing classic respiratory symptoms.

I’ve been treating with Tylan with not much success. Some have gotten better and some haven’t shown any symptoms and some have stayed the same.

Anyway I just got the test results back and I am in complete shock.

It is was negative for mycoplasma which I figured but positive for e.coli and something I have NEVER heard of before-
klebsiella????

I’m completely floored. I was thinking infectious bronchitis.

I don’t know anything about these two diseases. And again, long story short but I told this doctor that I wasn’t going to come back to his practice because I had heard nothing from him calling him three times telling him that I had lost three birds. I have another vet that I’m going to see but in the meantime can anybody give me some information about this in this?

I’m incredibly nervous about E. coli. Can we catch it. We have dogs that mean the world to us - can they catch it? I’m freaking out. What does any of this mean?
 

BaaKaaawk

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Ok, so I don't want to freak you out worse- but yes, absolutely some strands of E.coli can spread from chickens to humans (though I *think* most commonly you need to eat the chicken). That said- I can't tell you who to call but I'd start by looking up poultry E.Coli on the CDC. I'd treat this pretty seriously given the fact that it could effect you (and I am usually the relaxed on on here...)
 

boskelli1571

Crowing
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Mar 7, 2011
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E.coli is your biggest problem here as far as humans go. The bugs can be transferred onto surfaces very easily.
Hand washing is of prime importance - don't let kids in or around the coop without supervising the hygiene piece - the young and the old are very susceptible.
The klebsiella is likely more chicken specific - sadly there are increasing cases of it b/c folks insist on treating their birds with 'antibiotics' - whether they are specific to that disease or not. It is a huge problem for the industry and by extension human health.
You will need to clean the coop areas thoroughly with a bacterioside to kill the E.coli. Try to clean flooring/bedding etc. as best you can.
 

Eggcessive

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I would try to get into see the poultry vet again, and hopefully, they will see you. E.coli is a bacteria found in all barnyards and poultry houses. It is opportunistic, and frequently is a secondary infection in respiratory diseases when air sacculitis occurs. Klebsiella bacteria is also a cause of infection in the respiratory tract, and is found on skin and in the intestinal tract. Your poultry vet might want to change the antibiotic to one that treats gram negative infections like E.coli and Klebsiella, if you are still seeing sick chickens. I would not freak out too much, but glad that you got the report back.
 

berkchicks

Songster
Jun 29, 2018
162
152
141
Maryland
Thank you so much. I’m literally shaking right now.

I’m going to have them fax the results to the vet we take our dogs to - they see chickens too it’s just that it’s much further.

Are these contagious to chickens? Like why is almost everyone sick? The little bit that I can read about E. coli and the other one that I can’t even pronounce makes it sound like it’s not really contagious?

Can my dogs get it even though I have been keeping them separate from the chickens since they’ve been sick?

I wash my hands every single time I come in from the chickens.

This is so scary to me.
And the craziest part is is that all the chickens seem to be doing really well today.


I would try to get into see the poultry vet again, and hopefully, they will see you. E.coli is a bacteria found in all barnyards and poultry houses. It is opportunistic, and frequently is a secondary infection in respiratory diseases when air sacculitis occurs. Klebsiella bacteria is also a cause of infection in the respiratory tract, and is found on skin and in the intestinal tract. Your poultry vet might want to change the antibiotic to one that treats gram negative infections like E.coli and Klebsiella, if you are still seeing sick chickens. I would not freak out too much, but glad that you got the report back.
 

casportpony

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Don't freak out, E. Coli is a very common finding in avian respiratory infections. To treat it you need something that treats E. Coli. Me, I use Baytril, but it's banned for use in poultry, so you need to think about that.
 

berkchicks

Songster
Jun 29, 2018
162
152
141
Maryland
Whew ok that makes me feel a little bit better. :hmm Thank you.

I am assuming I need a prescription for Baytril?

Do you know anything about this klebsillia?

If we keep our dogs separated from the chickens they should be OK, correct? We haven’t let them near them since they started to get sick.
 

casportpony

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Don't worry about yourself or other animals, just wash your hands after handling them.

Baytril from the vet with their blessing would be best, but if that's not an option you can buy it online without a prescription.

Just read up on klebsillia and it's a gram negative bacteria like E. coli so something like Baytril will probably treat it too.
 

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