Egg stuck halfway out- Unbelievable recovery

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Scoot58, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. Scoot58

    Scoot58 In the Brooder

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    Apr 24, 2009
    Carver MA
    I have a hen with an egg stuck halfway out. What do I do???
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2009
  2. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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    Soak her in a tub of warm water. If that doesn't work, grease her up with olive oil and try to gently pull it out.
     
  3. jjhuntsalot

    jjhuntsalot In the Brooder

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    Feb 25, 2008
    White Plains KY
    Gently feel above it see if you can't feel why it didn't come out. Is it really half way? Is it extra large? You can always try to lube it. Just be carefull not to break it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  4. Scoot58

    Scoot58 In the Brooder

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    Apr 24, 2009
    Carver MA
    I got the egg out now her vent is prolapsed. What do I do now? I have pictures but not sure how to add them.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  5. Hens_And_Chicks

    Hens_And_Chicks Songster

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    Ohio
    I would say you need to lube your fingers with olive oil and gently put it back and apply preparation H hemerroid cream to shrink the tissues and relieve the swelling.

    If you do a search on "prolapsed vent", many threads will come up - here is one that seemed especially well worded and helpful.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=157703
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  6. Glenda L Heywood

    Glenda L Heywood Songster

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    iSOLATE HER AND THEN PUT SEVERAL TIMES SOME prep H
    IN THE VENT AND TRY PUSHING THE VENT AREA BACK IN

    DO THE PREP H TWICE TONIGHT AND HOLD YOU HAND OVER THE VENT TO HOLD THE PROLAPSE IN

    THE pREP H WILL SHRINK THE PROLAPSE

    NOW KEEP HER WARM AND IN DARK PLACE SUCH AS A BOX WITH TOWEL IN IT
    IF YOU HAVE A HEATING PAD PUT IT UNDER THE TOP LAYER OF THE TOWEL AND ON MIDIUM HEAT
    THIS WILL KEEP HER HAPPY AND HEALING

    DO THIS FOR THREE DAYS AND ONLY FEED HER A SLICE OF BREAD AND MILK THREE TIMES A DAY
    THIS WILL HELP HER GUT FLORA ALSO

    in the water put 1 pint of water with 1 tbsp of apple cider vinegar

    any questions email me
     
  7. Scoot58

    Scoot58 In the Brooder

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    Apr 24, 2009
    Carver MA
    This is what it looks like now. I tried to push it back in but it keeps popping back out. How far do I need to push it back in??

    Thank You for your help

    [​IMG]
     
  8. threehorses

    threehorses Songster

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    Houston
    It needs to be relatively flush with the vent. Did you try preparation H? It causes shrinkage and contraction of the tissues.

    By the way, egg binding like this is often a sign of calcium deficiency. We can work on that with you, too.

    Laying flocks should be on a diet that is mainly laying pellets which are designed not only to provide calcium in sufficient amounts for laying, but also the supporting nutrients that help calcium absorbtion. It's a good idea to also provide free-choice calcium supplementation for birds who feel they need more. There are various forms of this on the market. It should be provided in a separate container from their food. I use oyster shell granules.

    But calcium isn't enough. The bird's diets must not be high in grains (in addition to those in the pellets) because grains are high in phosphorus. While phosphorus is necessary for calcium being absorbed, it must be in a pretty exact proportion to the calcium. (2:1 calcium:phos is the normal proportion). Too much phosphorus causes the avian body to extract calcium from the body, including bones, to make up for the need. Too mush phos will also result in soft shelled eggs, egg binding, and prolapse.

    So 90% pellets, 10% treats and grains if you choose to give them.

    The other most important part of providing calcium is vitamin D3. Vitamin D is usually found in feeds, but it's an oil vitamin which means it unfortunately can degrade in a dry non-oily source, with age of the feed, and in sunlight. If you suspect calcium problems in your birds, boost their D vitamins. Yogurt is a nice choice for this in small amounts as it provides calcium, vitamin D, and also living bacteria which help food use. Apple cider vinegar (organic only - not because of the philosophy but because of its make-up) is another good choice. It enhances calcium absorbtion and also provides enzymes, electrolytes, and living beneficial bacteria.

    So when you get this hen on track, I'd give her a daily treat of yogurt, put some ACV in her water (1 ounce ACV per 1 gallon of water) for a week. Then do this occassionally during the month during heavy laying to keep things going nicely. I like once weekly or three days a month.

    P.S. Be sure to clean the vent thoroughly to remove the blood. Preparation H will help with the fissures, tiny breaks, in her skin. When she doesn't prolapse anymore, try using a non-cortisone antibiotic ointment like Neosporin on her vent for a week.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  9. i know that looks terrible, but it really isn't that bad. It would help to soak her bottom in warm water with epson salts and sugar. My vet told me that one. You can do it several times a day. Then just keep gently pushing it back in until it stays. The warm soaks will help to shrink the tissue.

    Also, it is a good idea to keep her in a dark quiet place. When this happened to my silkie i kept her inside in a hutch covered in a towel for actually about a week. You want to halt the egg-laying process and give that tissue a chance to heal.

    Yummy treats are good too - nonfat plain yogurt, chopped hard boiled egg, cucumber.

    Good luck, and let us know how it goes.
     
  10. Scoot58

    Scoot58 In the Brooder

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    Apr 24, 2009
    Carver MA
    You guys are the best. I am so happy you were here. I am getting her all set up in the dog crate until she heals. I am taking notes and making a shopping list. I love the suggestions. Keep them coming.
    Thank you!

    And Betty thanks you. You should have seen the look on her face when I got the egg out. I think I had the same look when my first child came out!
     

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