Eggs won't peel

Discussion in 'Egg, Chicken, & Other Favorite Recipes' started by Kaitie09, May 23, 2011.

  1. Kaitie09

    Kaitie09 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm having such a difficult time peel my eggs, I always have to go out and buy some. When I go to peel them ,the shell just comes off in little flakes, and normally takes a chunk of the egg white with it. The longest egg I have tried peel was 2 weeks old (before hard boiled). Any suggestions?
     
  2. azmotogirl

    azmotogirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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  3. BettyR

    BettyR Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This was posted by a member of this forum and it works like magic. I've even used it with eggs warm out of the nest with no problems.

    The Perfect Boiled Egg

    Get the water boiling first - rapid boil. Add a dash of salt. Gently lower room temperature eggs in with a ladle. 17 minutes later drain and put in ice waterÂ…allow them to sit in the ice water for another 17 minutes. Peel.

    I tried it tonight to see if I could duplicate the perfect egg. The eggs practically roll out of the shell. I have almost intact shells. Sooo easy.
     
  4. msgenie516

    msgenie516 The Happy Hen

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  5. Keeter

    Keeter Out Of The Brooder

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    This part will be repeating much of what you've read by now:

    Fresh eggs peel harder. Older eggs peel easier. Reason: dehydration with age causes the membrane to be pulled away from the shell.

    But this part is something I don't often see:

    The solution we have found is not to boil, but rather steam the eggs. By steaming, I can cook eggs on the day they're laid, and get almost perfect peeling on every one. Once in a while one will give me trouble.

    The reason is that steaming not only cooks, it dehydrates the egg. Boiling moisturizes the egg. Steaming won't dehydrate a vegetable, because the steam itself hydrates. But as the egg cooks, moisture seems to be driven out of the shell faster than the steam can push it back in. At least that's my take on it...no scientific evidence, just opinion.

    It also helps if you put a very small pinhole in the top of the egg before steaming. This allows more moisture to be driven out of the shell, better separating the membrane from the shell.

    You can go down to your kitchen store and buy an egg steamer. On brand is shaped like an egg, and holds up to six or seven eggs. They work pretty well. But we have owned a couple different ones, and neither works as well as what we do now. We took the egg stander insert from one of the commercial steamers, and cut the edges down with a Dremel tool until it fit within our regular stove-top vegetable steamer pot. It hold seven eggs very nicely in an upright position, not touching each other, good air space between them. Then we bring it up to steaming temp, put the lid on, turn the temp down to just high enough to maintain the steam level (lid barely floating), and time it for exactly 14 minutes.

    Perfect, peelable eggs every time, even from same-day-laids.
     
  6. Sissy

    Sissy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I put the eggs into water boil for 15- min.or so,
    drain and let sit in ice cold water/ but First
    I crack the egg a bit the cold water gets inside of the shell
    let them set in the cold water few min. and walla.
    it always works for me.[​IMG]
     

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