Eight Guineas and one Rooster sent off to Freezer Camp

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by HyLinda, Nov 12, 2010.

  1. HyLinda

    HyLinda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2010
    Warrens, WI
    I just finished sending my guineas and rooster to Freezer Camp. I tried pithing my first guinea but it didn't work. Maybe their head structure is too different, [​IMG]

    Then I proceeded with slicing the jugular - that worked quite well and didn't really seem to upset them too much, had a really sharp knife. I tried scalding them, but when I pulled on the feathers the skin ripped, so I skinned it. Then I tried pulling out the feathers without scalding and the skin still ripped so I skinned all the guineas.

    After pithing did not work with the guinea, I didn't want to try it on my rooster (his name was Edmund), so I cut his jugular also and he went quickly. I scalded him and the feathers came out really nice and the skin stayed intact.

    I used a cone (large empty bottle of laundry detergent) for all of them. so glad it's all over. I do not enjoy ending their lives, but that's why I got them in the first place. I have them in the fridge for 3 days, then I'll move them into the freezer. Might have roast chicken on Sunday. Edmund was a good egg - until he attacked my puppy.
     
  2. twister

    twister Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 12, 2009
    Mississippi
    Then I proceeded with slicing the jugular - that worked quite well and didn't really seem to upset them too much, had a really sharp knife

    my gosh...i am sure it devestated them.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. MandyH

    MandyH You'll shoot your eye out!

    Congrats on a job well done. I wish I could muster up the nerve to do one of my toms for Thanksgiving.
     
  4. aka Rachel

    aka Rachel Chillin' With My Peeps

    When I took my meaties to the processor, I swear they cut the jugular! However, I couldn't figure out how come they weren't flapping...they were just gone it seemed. My neighbour seems to think they were pithing them but there seemed to be alot of blood quickly [​IMG]

    Was this your first time processing? I agree with you, not pleasant but it was the point from the get go! (just did a few of my roos as well)
     
  5. HyLinda

    HyLinda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2010
    Warrens, WI
    Quote:They really didn't seem to notice the slice. There was some minor movement once most of the blood drained out. I did process 4 cornish x's this summer, but that did not go well at all. I didn't know about cones and some of the poor things got whacked 3 times. I felt like a monster [​IMG] I just want them to go peacefully and untraumatized. If I get some more cornish x's I may try pithing again because it sounds like it would be quicker for them if done properly. [​IMG]
     
  6. codymax2

    codymax2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 7, 2010
    Liverpool, NY
    We had an aweful first time too! We did the wacking off the head thing too and it was very traumatizing .... took more then on and they flapped alot and I got blood in my face!!! AHHH!!! Gonna try bleeding next time with a cone!!
    Quote:They really didn't seem to notice the slice. There was some minor movement once most of the blood drained out. I did process 4 cornish x's this summer, but that did not go well at all. I didn't know about cones and some of the poor things got whacked 3 times. I felt like a monster [​IMG] I just want them to go peacefully and untraumatized. If I get some more cornish x's I may try pithing again because it sounds like it would be quicker for them if done properly. [​IMG]
     
  7. SteveH

    SteveH Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 10, 2009
    West/Central IL
    Quote:Well done , congratulations . After reading of it here at BYC , I tried pithing on two . The first went perfectly and dry plucking did seem easy ; the second was a failure and the cockeral looked up at me while I was whetting my knife to slit his jugular . That one did not dry pluck easy and was skinned .
    About slitting the jugular as a means of dispatching ; as you said they really do not protest or seem to notice it at all . I'm sure that the handling up to that point is more upsetting to them . That last bit of reflexive movement is much less dramatic than beheaded and tossed on the ground as it was done back when I was a child .
     
  8. eKo_birdies

    eKo_birdies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 11, 2010
    Northern Colorado
    what temp were you scalding at? i've never had any skin rip when plucking my guineas [​IMG]
    the skin is really good when roasting them
     
  9. HyLinda

    HyLinda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2010
    Warrens, WI
    The temperature was 145°, but the skin ripped both with and without dunking.
     
  10. spartacus_63

    spartacus_63 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 21, 2009
    Central Iowa
    I sent three roos to freezer camp a couple weeks back. I suspended them from the clothes line one at a time and sliced their jugular. None of them flapped at all until the final death convulsion, which wasn't much. The trick for me was a very sharp knife and to get the blade under the feathers next to the skin before making the cut. I bled them into a bucket with some sawdust in the bottom. It was very easy and clean. We scalded the birds after bleeding and the feathers came out clean.
     

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