Emu Fencing

Discussion in 'Ostriches, Emu, Rheas' started by Czango, Jan 20, 2015.

  1. Czango

    Czango Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi everyone,
    I'm curious as to the fencing needs of emus. I have cattle panels as a possibility, but would like to be able to set up a portable system for a few birds, so I can rotate smaller pasture areas within a larger perimeter fence. Cattle panels are currently the frontrunner, but they can be a bit of a pain to move, and don't provide a huge degree of flexibility. I'm curious if anyone has had success with any sort of portable fencing, or if I'm out of luck in that regard. Thanks for the help!
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! Have you tried contacting emu breeders?

    -Kathy
     
  3. Czango

    Czango Out Of The Brooder

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    Hey, thanks for the reply! I haven't, simply due to the lack of emu breeders in my area. This was my first attempt to reach out about fencing, I was hoping someone on BYC would have some advice or comments. Thanks!
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    What size pens are you looking to make?

    -Kathy
     
  5. farmchick897

    farmchick897 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would think they could jump cattle panels especially if small pens and they are spooked. Depends on how calm your emus are though.
     
  6. Czango

    Czango Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the responses.

    Firstly, @casportpony ,
    As far as pasture size goes, I'm presently figuring that out. There are three different areas of 1-3 acres each where I can see the emus working, two of which are already perimeter fenced (for deer- large metal fences). We also have a space with shorter fencing, but much of it is brambles and awaits care from the goats, so I have no immediate plans for birds in that area. I own The Emu Farmer's Handbook (Minaar), but it really doesn't detail the fencing needs as much as I'd like. Research of mine on various sites has essentially given me the guideline "give them as much running space as you can". :D While this is helpful, I'd like something generally more specific.

    This is all very much in the planning phase, but a resource I've been frequently referencing is the following link: http://www.redoakfarm.com/facilities.htm
    It provides the intriguing "wagon wheel" design that I'd like to adapt into a rotational grazing model. (http://www.redoakfarm.com/wagonwheelpendesign.htm) I'm just looking into two birds, so my operation obviously won't be on this scale, which is why I'm going for flexibility rather than permanence.


    @Farmchick,
    Thanks for your input, I'll definitely have to consider that. I've heard they're good jumpers, and I know the majority of people seem to use 6' fencing. Again, nothing has been acted on yet, so I'm very open to suggestions like this. In the link above, I know the farm there seems to say cattle panels can work, though it does say "with wire on the outside"-I assume this refers to chicken wire or something similar. Because the area I have has a strong fence on the outside, a few escapes won't be an issue, but I'd rather not be rounding up birds constantly. I'll have to see if anyone has successfully used cattle panels in the past, perhaps I'll have to default to taller fencing method.


    All in all, I'm generally trying to avoid exhaustion of the plant life and soil that might occur if I gave them unlimited access to the area, and rotation would give me a chance to irrigate or replant ground they'd been on in the past. I do this with my smaller poultry, moving them every week using an electronet system, and although I've had escapees there, they're generally inclined to stay in, as their need for foraging is always satisfied. Naturally they're a totally different part of the bird family tree, so I'm aware that emus may behave differently!

    Sorry this was so long, and thanks for your time!
     
  7. Czango

    Czango Out Of The Brooder

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    Just found an older fencing thread, super helpful and informative. I'm seeing that portable may not be the way to go, perhaps I'll have to permanently divide a pasture into parts with a taller fence, and rotate the birds in there. Thanks for your input, it's been thought-provoking.
     
  8. briefvisit

    briefvisit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There's an immense amount of information in past posts.

    SE
     
  9. Czango

    Czango Out Of The Brooder

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    There definitely is, I've had a good time looking through them in the past months (though I only really got caught up today). Amusingly, I feel like I know a fair amount of the people here, but I realized no one knows me! Thanks everyone for the informative discussions, even if I'm looking at them after the fact!
     
  10. farmchick897

    farmchick897 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've never had trouble containing my two in ~acre pasture with cattle fencing. They also don't keep the grass down at all like chickens do. I have to mow it, but they do pace the fence line no matter what size pasture they are in. Are you getting adult emus or chicks?
     

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