Enemies in the gate: An awful puppy

BigBlueHen53

Love one another ❤️
Mar 5, 2019
21,206
80,883
1,287
SE Missouri, USA
Soooo I know that tethering dogs is controversial, but getting a tie out for the puppy would be helpful. Shore up the chickens' run and work on training too. Those things take time though, so in the mean time a tie down would be a good option. Just make sure to put it somewhere the dog has access to the shelter, supervise initially to make sure the dog doesn't freak out, and don't leave the dog on it for extended periods of time. My family has used in when we're out in the woods to prevent the dog from chasing deer.
Access to shelter and water, and can't hang himself.
 

Tobymartin601

In the Brooder
Sep 11, 2021
11
26
21
I don’t have much experience with this, but in my opinion I would fence them in better, make sure it’s secure so the dog can’t dig in or jump up inside.

My neighbors have hot wire everywhere, their dog will not come near it even when it’s turned off, it’s the fear factor. She thinks the hot wire is on so she stays in. My sister burnt herself, only a tiny bit though.
I think that's looking like the best solution right now, thanks!
 

dogpatchchickens

In the Brooder
Mar 22, 2020
15
18
33
So my dad got a golden doodle puppy last April, so he's about ten months old now. As of yesterday, my flock of thirteen has slowly dwarfed into a flock of 4 because of him. We put up a fence, using garden posts and fencing, to let them range in our back yard. Today, the puppy, Biscuit, learned that he can jump the fence, and I caught him mid tossing my speckled sussex. She's alive, but sensitive right now.
He jumped over a portion of the fence that was beginning to lean over, it rained alot the other day.
I believe that he can't jump it now because I straightened it up, but that remains to be seen.

My question is if I should add an electric wire to the top of the fence so he doesn't jump, or if I should build a fully enclosed, smaller run and only let them range while supervised. Or both? I can't get rid of Biscuit, that isn't my choice, and he's imprinted on me and my parents.
I'm just afraid that I need to take action now, or else he'll get the rest of my chooks.
Any thoughts?
I'm not a fan of shock collars but might make an exception for this guy. If you would use it, you need to make him think the shock is coming from the chickens, not you. Otherwise, he'll just wait until you are out of sight to go after another chicken.
 

catballou

Songster
Feb 12, 2021
201
207
126
Michigan
So my dad got a golden doodle puppy last April, so he's about ten months old now. As of yesterday, my flock of thirteen has slowly dwarfed into a flock of 4 because of him. We put up a fence, using garden posts and fencing, to let them range in our back yard. Today, the puppy, Biscuit, learned that he can jump the fence, and I caught him mid tossing my speckled sussex. She's alive, but sensitive right now.
He jumped over a portion of the fence that was beginning to lean over, it rained alot the other day.
I believe that he can't jump it now because I straightened it up, but that remains to be seen.

My question is if I should add an electric wire to the top of the fence so he doesn't jump, or if I should build a fully enclosed, smaller run and only let them range while supervised. Or both? I can't get rid of Biscuit, that isn't my choice, and he's imprinted on me and my parents.
I'm just afraid that I need to take action now, or else he'll get the rest of my chooks.
Any thoughts?
A poodle has a high prey drive but with proper training, they can be taught to leave chickens alone. A golden is not as prey driven, but please take your dog in the house and teach it manners and to "leave it"!
I had a doodle dog. He was fine with my chickens after a 10 minute lesson in the bathroom with my chicks.
 

arwoon

Crowing
Jun 19, 2017
2,055
6,273
421
You probably already know
I have had a similar problem with our family dog. We heightened an existing chain link fence with chicken wire, lined it with bricks and buried carpet to prevent digging. You could also try a shock collar, but with some dogs if you don't start early you can't ever fully uproot their thirst for killing chickens. I agree that an electric fence would be a good investment to investigate. Hope that helped!
 

dogpatchchickens

In the Brooder
Mar 22, 2020
15
18
33
So my dad got a golden doodle puppy last April, so he's about ten months old now. As of yesterday, my flock of thirteen has slowly dwarfed into a flock of 4 because of him. We put up a fence, using garden posts and fencing, to let them range in our back yard. Today, the puppy, Biscuit, learned that he can jump the fence, and I caught him mid tossing my speckled sussex. She's alive, but sensitive right now.
He jumped over a portion of the fence that was beginning to lean over, it rained alot the other day.
I believe that he can't jump it now because I straightened it up, but that remains to be seen.

My question is if I should add an electric wire to the top of the fence so he doesn't jump, or if I should build a fully enclosed, smaller run and only let them range while supervised. Or both? I can't get rid of Biscuit, that isn't my choice, and he's imprinted on me and my parents.
I'm just afraid that I need to take action now, or else he'll get the rest of my chooks.
Any thoughts?
I'm not a fan of shock collars, but think I might make an exception in this case. But, you need to make him think the shock is coming from the girls, not you. Put the collar on and as soon as he starts to evil eye one of the girls, zap him. Shouldn't take long for him to start believing those chickens are nasty little suckers not to be messed with😆
Good luck
 

Double Yolked

Songster
Nov 7, 2017
149
373
166
Pacific Northwest USA
So my dad got a golden doodle puppy last April, so he's about ten months old now. As of yesterday, my flock of thirteen has slowly dwarfed into a flock of 4 because of him. We put up a fence, using garden posts and fencing, to let them range in our back yard. Today, the puppy, Biscuit, learned that he can jump the fence, and I caught him mid tossing my speckled sussex. She's alive, but sensitive right now.
He jumped over a portion of the fence that was beginning to lean over, it rained alot the other day.
You're very lucky to live in the UK not the US or your dog would be in grave and deadly danger. Here, it's not always realized (by city dwellers) but it's perfectly legal to shoot a dog who is harassing's and killing livestock. Animal control will seize and destroy it if they spot it happening. As for why? Simple, a dog that starts killing livestock, even small ones like chickens, has a good chance of graduating to larger things.
And don't anyone start on how "that can't happen" as I've observed it before as have other animal keepers I know. It's not the dogs fault, it's always considered to be the owners fault, but the poor dog is the one who pays the price for the owners not restraining it.

As to breaking him from harming the chickens? Find a GOOD dog trainer at once and ask questions about how to break him from harassing. He's killing animals and that is not something you want to have said about a dog in your control. You are doing him no good in allowing it. Should he kill someone else's beloved chook or moggy you'd be very liable.
I have heard of the dead chicken method. I know of someone who used it and it supposedly succeeded. Hopefully it would work for you. But you need at once to keep that dog by any means possible, from continuing to threaten and kill other animals.
 

dogpatchchickens

In the Brooder
Mar 22, 2020
15
18
33
So my dad got a golden doodle puppy last April, so he's about ten months old now. As of yesterday, my flock of thirteen has slowly dwarfed into a flock of 4 because of him. We put up a fence, using garden posts and fencing, to let them range in our back yard. Today, the puppy, Biscuit, learned that he can jump the fence, and I caught him mid tossing my speckled sussex. She's alive, but sensitive right now.
He jumped over a portion of the fence that was beginning to lean over, it rained alot the other day.
I believe that he can't jump it now because I straightened it up, but that remains to be seen.

My question is if I should add an electric wire to the top of the fence so he doesn't jump, or if I should build a fully enclosed, smaller run and only let them range while supervised. Or both? I can't get rid of Biscuit, that isn't my choice, and he's imprinted on me and my parents.
I'm just afraid that I need to take action now, or else he'll get the rest of my chooks.
Any thoughts?
I'm not a fan of shock collars but might make an exception for this guy. If you would use it, you need to make him think the shock is coming from the chickens, not you. Otherwise, he'll just wait until you are out of sight to go after another chicken.
 

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