Feeding WORMS to Chickens?

TheBantyCoop

Songster
Jun 9, 2015
313
132
146
The California Coast
Its been stormy out in the CA, so free ranging time hasn't been easy to find. I bought my girls some "super worms" at the pet market today as a special treat, and read that they can bite and sting. I am not sure how true this is or how much damage it could do, but I gave the worms a quick nip on the head before feeding anyway (using tweezers). Was this necessary? I was just worried cause chickens don't chew their food, and I have a friend whose chick was eaten from the inside by a feeder worm. Other than safety I would like to know what kind of worm is the best to feed chickens. Feeder worms or garden worms? What are the health benefits of the different types?

Any advice would be great! Thanks!

-El
 
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JetCat

Songster
Oct 26, 2015
806
65
129
Southeast Alabama
superworms can bite, they don't sting. any animal that swallows them whole could be bitten after swallowing so most pinch the heads, while mealworms have a harder to digest exoskeleton they are a lot less hassle to both raise and feed to your chickens without the worry of bites.

both superworms and mealworms are high in fat so they should only be fed in moderation but most of us that raise them do overfeed without any issues.
 
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TheBantyCoop

Songster
Jun 9, 2015
313
132
146
The California Coast
I would stick to mealworms. Anything that can bite or sting sounds like a bad idea. Garden worms (earth and red) can carry tapeworms and other parasites.

Ok, thanks! I also bought some waxworms the other day, but they seem pretty high in fat and pretty low on the healthy stuff.....

(Sorry for the late reply! Christmas had me literally all wrapped up!!)
 

TheBantyCoop

Songster
Jun 9, 2015
313
132
146
The California Coast
superworms can bite, they don't sting. any animal that swallows them whole could be bitten after swallowing so most pinch the heads, while mealworms have a harder to digest exoskeleton they are a lot less hassle to both raise and feed to your chickens without the worry of bites.

both superworms and mealworms are high in fat so they should only be fed in moderation but most of us that raise them do overfeed without any issues.

Thanks for the info! Mealworms seem like the winners!

(Also sorry for the late reply!)
 
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JetCat

Songster
Oct 26, 2015
806
65
129
Southeast Alabama
Ok, thanks! I also bought some waxworms the other day, but they seem pretty high in fat and pretty low on the healthy stuff.....

(Sorry for the late reply! Christmas had me literally all wrapped up!!)

be careful with waxworms, if they by chance get away and aren't ate they can completely destroy bee hives during their life cycle.

Are super worms raised like meal works?
just like them with the exception of supers won't pupate unless they are isolated (the larger multi compartment weekly medicine containers work good for this), makes it a good bit more labor intensive to raise them because of that.
 

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