FERMENTED FEEDS...anyone using them?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Beekissed, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. 22qZoo

    22qZoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have been wondering about some of the same stuff. I've eaten my fair share of yogurt,drink a kambucha once in a while,like sauerkraut,not a huge fan of kim-che .What other ways can people get the benefits of FF? I am guessing that cooking something that's been fermented kills off the live cultures ,but does the concept of the nutrients being more available still apply after it's cooked?

    I've been really happy with the health of my small flock of 20 ish (chicken math)since putting them all on FF. I haven't had any sickness or health issues to deal with since. But I was wondering, do any of you that have been doing FF for a long time do any annual spring/fall de-worming,dusting for mites? Don't need to be a solution looking for a problem.
     
  2. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    I examine the birds for parasites but do not do preventative dusting, just preventative environment maintenance. I do a deep litter that is bug friendly, attracting predator bugs that prey on parasite eggs and larvae. Providing adequate dusting spots, clean soils underfoot, good ventilation, low stocking rates, yearly culling for nonlaying/older flock members and exposure to sunlight can help prevent many parasite problems.
     
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  3. It generally takes 3/4 days for a good ferment, depending on your temps.
     
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  4. LeslieDJoyce

    LeslieDJoyce Overrun With Chickens

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    Cooking is another way to "release" the nutrients in food. I believe that some studies show cooking after soaking, sprouting or fermenting grains can be beneficial, though likewise probably some of the more delicate things (living probiotics) are destroyed during cooking.

    Here in the USA we mostly get our ferments from dairy, alcohol, pepperoni on pizza, pickles on hamburgers, and maybe sourdough bread or sauerkraut if like those "sour" things. Oh, and soy sauce, tofu, or tempeh, though I don't believe the industrialized versions of those things represent true fermentation. Yeast for bread is a form of fermentation, though I don't believe it has acted upon the grains enough to improve the nutrition ... it just helps make them more fun to eat. This is likely true for lots of pickled things unless they are traditionally pickled. You can pickle eggs ... not sure how that adds to the nutritional profile of them, though ... hmmmm

    Internationally speaking, fermentation is a big deal. A lot of the world's population has traditional fermented feeds ... I'll skip the examples and provide some links that discuss the importance of fermentation both by thing fermented and by region ... so do take a look at the links even if you don't read every word ... the lists are extensive.

    The first two were produced by The United Nations. That's how important fermentation is to a lot of the world. I especially appreciate the one on Cereal Grains as that is particularly important to keeping chickens.

    This one is about fermenting Cereal Grains ...
    http://www.fao.org/docrep/x2184e/x2184e00.HTM

    This one is about Fruits & Vegetables ...
    http://www.fao.org/docrep/x0560e/x0560e00.htm

    I turned to Wikipidia for a list of fermented milk products ...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermented_milk_products

    Here is an overview of Fermentation in Food Processing by Wikipedia ... in addition to the items discussed above, it discusses alcohols and meats and even tea ...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermentation_in_food_processing

    Happy reading!
     
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  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    So, do most of you who use FF for your adult populations, start chicks on FF? Or do you start on dry, and switch to FF, or offer both??
     
  6. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    FF from start to finish, nothing else offered. Makes for a strong chick and health chicken.
     
  7. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    I'm starting 7 layer chicks, and 10 meat birds this spring. It'll be interesting to see what the feed conversion rate is for the meat birds on FF. anyone grown Pioneers?
     

  8. FF for the babies on up. :)
     
  9. kpgoldstar

    kpgoldstar Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is my first flock. FF from chicks up to adults. Mine are 21 weeks now. They had dry for a week before I found out about FF. Nothing else offered other than kitchen scraps since.
     
  10. 22qZoo

    22qZoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    LeslieDjoyce- thank you for all the links, whew, that is a lot of reading. Psychological health via gut health is a fascinating topic . I think I am going to try to find some recipes of fermented stuff that I can get the family to eat without them knowing that its good for them.
     

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