First Rooster Kills

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by CoopedUpChicken, Jul 2, 2016.

  1. CoopedUpChicken

    CoopedUpChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We are 1 year and 2 months into keep a flock of chickens and over that time we had 1 clutch of eggs that were hatched by a broody hen. We learned our lesson today about roosters. We ended up with too many roosters (7 roosters and 20 hens). We were able to feed 3 roosters to predators but the other 4 roosters ended up being too much. Today a hen got a split side and it sucked!

    We shot the 2 big roosters with a 9 mm in the head and we are working on killing 1 more tomorrow.

    No more crazy crowing in the early morning and no more split hens.

    We didn't think we could kill chickens, but necessity is the mother of 9 mm's.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. TheKindaFarmGal

    TheKindaFarmGal Chicken Obsessed

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    You should keep two roosters with twenty hens. Do you free range?
     
  3. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    I hope you ate them?
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    This.

    Personally, I wouldn't waste the ammo on a rooster. A knife is "greener" [​IMG]. But whatever makes your skirt fly up.
     
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  5. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    I hope you ate them, too. The "weapon of choice" around here is a hatchet and stump.
     
  6. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    What is a split side on a hen? Checking to make certain you are not scapegoating roosters for a problem caused by something else.
     
  7. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Many of us get to this point, it does get easier, but even when you know it has to be done, the first few times can be very difficult. However, the peace of the flock is always worth it. Often times new people get on here who are in love with their pet rooster, and cannot imagine killing this animal, or really any animal, and that is their choice, however part of the problem in the discussion is they do not really believe how difficult too many roosters or the wrong rooster can be to live with, especially in a back yard space.

    If you don't eat them, plant them under a rose bush.

    Mrs K
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2016
  8. AK Chick

    AK Chick Out Of The Brooder

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    When we first started with chickens, we were "gifted" with 9 rooster pullets. We had only 6 hens at the time. We had no idea then how to tell the difference between hens and rooster pullets, and quickly figured out that they were just devouring the feed and injuring my hens, so when they got a bit bigger, my husband went out and culled them. It was quick, the .22 did the job, and we had an afternoon of preparing them for the freezer. The kids learned why we only name one rooster, and we put dinner in the freezer. My hens are happier, and the roosters were tasty.
     
  9. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    While one good rooster can service 20 hens, I always like to have a backup. I often plan breeding programs and just when I get too complacent a predator will figure out how to skirt the security system or more likely I will have an escapee. In the past year I have lost three roosters. One followed my husband out the gate and stayed out sounding the alarm while the hens raced to safety. The second rooster also died defending the hens and I had to scrounge for a rooster and I'm not sure what happened to the little bantam. I have a feeling he flew over the fence at the wrong time.[​IMG]
    Now I have a large fowl and bantam rooster and have four cockerels in a grow out pen where they will stay until I decide who I want to be my second large rooster or if anyone needs a rooster.
    Unfortunately foxes, raccoons and opossums abound here, but everyone in the neighborhood tries to keep one step ahead of them.
     

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