First Time Chick Parents, Spring 2016

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by feetkissearth, Feb 18, 2016.

  1. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    some hatcheries have different systems then others. it could be marked for either being a male or a female. if you can find out which hatchery your chicks came from you might be able to find out if they mark only roos or visa/versa. if you have a good feed store manager they could possibly let you know exactly what the mark means. I'd give them a call then you will know for certain what sex the little one is. some hatcheries use different colors or marks to tell the roos apart but some mark the pullets as well. it sure is cute!! I'd call just to make sure it's a roo marking.
     
  2. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    My Coop
    They will when they get used to the fact that the light is gone. If they are using the pad at night, they definitely know where "warm" is, but chickens (and their little counterparts) are creatures of habit. To them the lamp during the day is their "normal" and if it's not there they get confused, - and the owners panic. If I'm visualizing what you're saying, you turn the lamp off and then stand there to see what they'll do, is that right? So they suddenly have no light, no warmth all over the entire brooder, and you. Yep, they'll be confused. They aren't huddling as much for warmth as they are for security. So turn it off. Tuck a couple under MHP and hold your hand gently in front of the opening so they can't get back out. This just reminds them of where the heat is. Put some treats in the bottom of the brooder near the opening of MHP, or even on top. Then walk away. Leave. Let them figure it out. Come back in an hour or two and just peek in. You might be very surprised.

    I don't have any scientific expertise to back up my theory, but I believe that by doing absolutely everything for the animals we care for, we do them a huge disservice. They don't have to rely on their own brains to help them figure out what to do. Ever heard someone talk about a dog that is perfectly capable physically of jumping into the car, but won't do it because he never had to learn? From the time he really had to be picked up and put in as a young puppy, physically unable to do it yet, the work was done for him. As he got bigger he just stood by the side of the car while the owners tried to coax him to do it himself, but he just stood there, waiting for what he's accustomed to. And they picked him up an put him in, again and again. Now 5 years later here he is, 60 pounds of dead weight being heaved into the car while the owners complain. Yeah, it's like that. We all seem to be of the mindset that says we have to do everything for our chicks - we don't. Instead of them being little divas, we need to let them be chickens. One of the things they need to learn to do is how to meet some of their own needs. We do need to provide them with an adequate diet, plenty of water, and a safe and clean environment. Providing some things for themselves - scratching in the ground and finding little bugs and such, self regulating their heat needs and exploring to learn their world - is just what Mom would do. Good luck!!
     
  3. debbobbytla2010

    debbobbytla2010 Out Of The Brooder

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    I need help. One of my chicks has diarrhea and another on has loose poop. What could it be and what can I do? They are one chick feed the starter/grower one and a few cheerios.
     
  4. 907ChickenLady

    907ChickenLady Out Of The Brooder

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    Whoop whoop! The neighbor came over to help and I see 4 walls and a roof on the coop. I'm crossing my fingers I get to kick the ladies out of my bathroom today. I'll miss the cheeps, but not the smell (and definitely not the toddler tantrums associated with the brooder). Other than having the MHP set up, bedding, food, and water, should I be thinking of anything else as NECESSARY to the coop for these 3 week olds? Nesting boxes and roosts will be built in the near future.
     
  5. jonnygiant

    jonnygiant Out Of The Brooder

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    How old, were they exposed to dirt outside, did the receive any vaccines? Cocci produces diarrhea.
     
  6. MedSchlFarmers

    MedSchlFarmers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also, you may consider posting pictures of the poop. My chicks always had loose poop that smelled really bad when they were scared or put in a new environment.....so whenever they were handled by my children or moved somewhere new so ther brooder could be cleaned. It is normal. It just a depends on what the diarrhea is like.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2016
  7. debbobbytla2010

    debbobbytla2010 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2016
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    They will be a week tomorrow 3/14. No they didn't have an vaccines. They are Barred Rock.
     
  8. debbobbytla2010

    debbobbytla2010 Out Of The Brooder

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    ok thank you. We are new at raising chicks.
     
  9. debbobbytla2010

    debbobbytla2010 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2016
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    They will be a week tomorrow 3/14. No they didn't have an vaccines. They are Barred Rock. They weren't exsposed to an dirt.
     
  10. MedSchlFarmers

    MedSchlFarmers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No problem! We are new to chickens too, ours are just a little older now. It concerned me at first too. Do you think it is normal diarrhea due to being startled or unsure? For our chicks it was still brown, very runny and very stinky.
     

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