Forest Nest - what now?

GAdominique

Hatching
Oct 30, 2018
2
7
6
one of my hens has been sneaking off to build a somewhat concealed nest in the forest near their protected coop & nesting area. Now she has close to a dozen eggs and is mostly staying on the nest. I would like to let her finish but I’m worried about nocturnal predators and snakes. What should I do? Should I move her eggs out of the forest and create a separate nesting area in the existing pen? Thanks!!
 

Cyprus

Master of the 'never give up' attitude
Jan 19, 2018
16,113
55,585
1,207
My Coop
My Coop
one of my hens has been sneaking off to build a somewhat concealed nest in the forest near their protected coop & nesting area. Now she has close to a dozen eggs and is mostly staying on the nest. I would like to let her finish but I’m worried about nocturnal predators and snakes. What should I do? Should I move her eggs out of the forest and create a separate nesting area in the existing pen? Thanks!!
She is going broody.
Move her and her eggs into a secure pen.
If you don't have a rooster, don't let her sit.
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
30,774
248,356
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NY Southern Tier
My Coop
My Coop
Hello and welcome to BYC! :frow
Obviously, if the eggs are not fertile, remove them.
If they are, you should remove the entire nest and put her and the nest in a secure area for her to finish what she's started.
You will need to have an area large enough for her to raise them and be prepared to take over if she is a bad broody and starts to attack/kill them. You will also need to figure out now what you want to do with the chicks. Do you have enough room to keep the pullets when they mature? What will you do with the cockerels from the bunch?
Good luck!
 

townchicks

Free Ranging
Dec 1, 2016
1,999
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Contra Costa county, Ca.
What ever you decide to do about raising chicks, you can't just leave her there. She is very vulnerable to predators. Personally if she were mine, I'd toss all those eggs and lock that hen in the coop, and spend the winter building a safe broody box, so you are properly prepared to raise chicks, the next time she goes broody. That's assuming you have a rooster, of course. If you don't, there is no point in letting a hen go broody in the first place.
 

GAdominique

Hatching
Oct 30, 2018
2
7
6
Hello and welcome to BYC! :frow
Obviously, if the eggs are not fertile, remove them.
If they are, you should remove the entire nest and put her and the nest in a secure area for her to finish what she's started.
You will need to have an area large enough for her to raise them and be prepared to take over if she is a bad broody and starts to attack/kill them. You will also need to figure out now what you want to do with the chicks. Do you have enough room to keep the pullets when they mature? What will you do with the cockerels from the bunch?
Good luck!
Thanks for the response! I’ve got room; i’ll Work on a safe spot. :)
 

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