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Frontline ???

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by doxies1, Mar 14, 2011.

  1. BodhiRoc

    BodhiRoc New Egg

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    Quote:Hi Peigic - I'm not an expert on this chemical, but my understanding - which may be flawed, but is based on the information from the manufacturer (which is not available publicly as far as I know) as well as Fipronil fact sheet I linked to (I have requested the cited reference through interlibrary loan, but it will take awhile to get to me) - is that most of the chemical does stay in the skin and it does decrease through the month. This was the point of the 1/2 and 1/10th calculations toward the end. Thing is, I don't know how it partitions - is it 1 gram in the egg for every 2 grams in the skin? is it 1 gram in 10? 1 in 100? And exactly how the chemical decreases (linearly or exponentially) is another question. Usual chemical kinetics would argue for the exponential model- which is why I focused on that - but with it being in the skin, maybe it behaves differently.

    -Greg
     
  2. mkhenderson17

    mkhenderson17 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Getting 0.5mL is very easy. Tractor Supply and other farm stores sells steryl srynges, or you can get them from your veterinarian. Just take a needle (witch you can buy from there too) and draw up the solution.


    So my question.... In reality is it safe to put one drop on each chicken to take care of mites?

    Thanks!


    Mandy
     
  3. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    I do hope someone can correct me if I am wrong-- I have studied a lot of avian biology, but I am not an expert nor a veterinarian trained in avian medicine.

    I understand that fipronil distributes in the oil glands of mammals. Mammals (at least the one that Frontline is intended for) have oil glands throughout their skin, as do we. Thus, the distribution of fipronil in the skin makes sense for mammals. Birds, however, do not have oil glands that translate to those of a mammal; most birds (or, in this case let us just assume chickens) have a singular oil gland, the 'preen' gland or more scientifically the uropygial gland at the base of the tail. This gland excretes the oils/wax esters that the bird then uses its beak and face to distribute over the feathers of the entire body. Because of the method of distribution, birds often ingest a fair bit of the preen oil, in addition to get it on the skin of the face (especially around the eyes and cheeks).

    Because of this, my questions are:

    1. Does fipronil actually distribute itself solely to oil glands in the skin, and if so does it do so in a chicken? Does it concentrate in the uropygial gland?
    2. If the above is true, does this mean that when preening, the chicken ingests more fipronil than we expect, and can possibly cause short or long term health problems in the chicken or the people that eat the chicken's products?
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. BodhiRoc

    BodhiRoc New Egg

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    Quote:I'd LOVE an answer to this, if anyone has one.
     
  5. peigic

    peigic Out Of The Brooder

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    Running down the path of assumptions (part of the paving of the road to heck, I'm sure):

    -- I can't imagine the chicken is distributing oils from preening by licking them and spitting them out. They've gotta be just rubbing the beak in there, yes?

    P.
     
  6. peigic

    peigic Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:Oh duh, I reread it through the end. [​IMG] Now I gots it.
     
  7. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    Quote:To my understanding, the uropygial usually has a 'wick' feather that sort of looks like a strange, frayed down feather if you look closely (I have examined ones from larger galliformes such as turkeys). The bird sort of gently gives a squeeze to the gland if necessary, or if the 'wick' is already full it will take an amount into its beak, and distribute it as it preens and zips the feathers through the beak during normal preening motions. Birds will often rub their faces on the gland as well (if you ever see your birds cock their tail at a funny angle, ruffle their saddle feathers, and then rub their face all over their back/rump this is what they are doing) to distribute the preen oil.
     
  8. GA_in_GA

    GA_in_GA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Newbie to the world of BYC.

    Realized today that my two BCM pullets are infested with lice (based on the egg sacks I saw). Have DE in their sand pit, though it appears DE is not enough.

    Will Frontline work on lice? I have Frontline in spray and the cat doses.

    Advice appreciated!
     
  9. GA_in_GA

    GA_in_GA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you.

    Just used the spray, very sparingly on the girls. Plan to tackle the coop and run tomorrow. Of course the one pullet is just about to produce her first egg for us . . . [​IMG]
     

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