Garden Coop vs Wichita Cabin Chicken Coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by fightingbunny, Mar 1, 2017.

  1. fightingbunny

    fightingbunny Chillin' With My Peeps

    162
    59
    91
    Aug 9, 2016
    Maryland
    Garden Coop
    http://www.thegardencoop.com/

    Wichita Cabin Chicken Coop
    http://homesteadlifestyle.com/diy-wichita-cabin-chicken-coop/

    I am not that build savy, could someone tell me what the main difference is between these two? I like the style with the single roofline and raised coop. To my eyes, these look the same?

    I need to pick one or the other and try to scale it up to fit 8 chickens. I also am adding more run and extending that part, but without the roof part. Would either of these work for that?

    I also prefer the nest boxes to be internal just to prevent water issues (again, not very build savy). Both claim that you can make them with the nest box in or out.

    Thanks for any advice!!
    Jenn
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2017
  2. Merrymouse

    Merrymouse Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    777
    114
    136
    Jan 8, 2017
    Massachusetts
    Hey! I found your thread! Anyway I also considered the Garden coop but I was also considering the garden loft. So here's the differences as I see it. As you know I went with Wichita style.

    First the roofline is a little different and I wasnt sure how to make those angled rafters. Also I liked the solid metal roof better the the polycarb roof. Just preference and also my hubby did not like the poly roof.

    Second, I preferred the ramp to come out of the side of the coop not from underneath. When it comes from underneath it just takes up floor space in the coop and also all the coop litter will be constantly falling out. I don't see any reason why you couldn't build the garden coop and just install the pop door on the side.

    Third, The coop itself seems higher off the ground than the wichita so depending on how tall you are it might be harder to reach all the way in to clean. Im short so this was a consideration. That being said its nice to have all that head room under the coop for the hens and maybe even put your food and water under there.

    Fourth, I liked the bigger doors and windows on the wichita, again I'm sure you could modify the garden coop for bigger doors and windows.

    Fifth, I like the exterior nest boxes for two reasons. 1. you dont have to enter or even open the coop to collect eggs which will be a daily thing, and 2. you dont use up precious floor space with nest boxes. You may want to add more chicks at some point so square footage is at a premium.

    Sixth, the wichita just looked more sturdy and substantial to me. This is all just personal preference as both coops are very nice and very functional.

    I will say this about the garden coop, especially if you are new to building anything, it will be nice and easier and less frustrating and probably less costly (because you will probably make less errors) to have the full plans that the garden coop offers. (How was that for a run on sentence:))There are no full plans for the wichita. You can purchase for like $5 a "sort of" material list with a sketch up drawing which is helpful but it is in no way a full plan. I personally had a hard time with the sketch up part but I am challenged when it comes to programs like that where others may find it extremely user friendly. I mostly just looked at other peoples builds and asked a bazillion questions on this forum and kind of figured it out as I went.

    Good luck on whatever you decide! And please post pictures. When are you starting?

    Also I noticed you were looking for blue egg layers. Don't know what your plans are as far as ordering but I was unable to get any blue egg layers with the assortment of other breeds I wanted on the specific dates I wanted.

    Hope this is helpful[​IMG]
     
  3. SueT

    SueT Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,597
    741
    226
    May 27, 2015
    SW MO
    Looking at the 2 different styles, I think the Garden coop company is exaggerating the number of chickens that little inner space can hold. Eight would be too many. I'd say max 4, unless you are talking about bantams. Your friend's insights are well thought out, and if you go with their model, you can get their advice as you proceed with each step.
     
  4. fightingbunny

    fightingbunny Chillin' With My Peeps

    162
    59
    91
    Aug 9, 2016
    Maryland
    I currently have 4 large chickens and want to build a coop sized for 8. My zoning restricts me to 8 chickens, so no amount of chicken math can get me above that :) Except maybe if I hatch chicks....but then they have to go when old enough!

    The garden coop looks a lot easier to build although less sturdy. I have limited time and skill, so I might adapt the garden coop just to make things easier!! The roof on the wichita intimidates me...

    If I were to size up the garden coop, how would I do that? I do not mind buying the plans and I have already sent the garden coop seller an email asking for help on that.

    Adaptions I would do to the garden coop:
    1) SIZE!!! That just looks way small for 8 chickens
    2) External nest box on front, door on front of nest box and not a lift up (child needs to get in there and I hate lift up things)
    3) Coop on left
    4) Ramp out the side and not the floor
    5) Gutter to rain barrel (no idea how gutters attach,...can they even go on this type of roof?)
    6) Run extension continuing to the right, basically double the plan size, no roof just mesh
    7) My terrain goes down to the right, so I will have to stagger the bottom in sections...the roof will be level, but the base has to zig zag down. This scares me!

    Why do people put the big door for the coop inside the run? When I clean out, I want to put a wheel barrow under the door and pull out everything. Wouldn't a door on the outside of the coop work better for that? I just picture chickens going everywhere while I am trying to clean. I also have a problem that mine love to peck my eyes, so I have to watch them carefully.

    Whew, I am almost talking myself into spending ridiculous money and just buying something :(

    Thanks for any feedback, you all are the best!!

    Jenn
     
  5. Merrymouse

    Merrymouse Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    777
    114
    136
    Jan 8, 2017
    Massachusetts
    First, your eyes![​IMG] That is scary.
    For the size, I found it pretty easy to size up but to make it as simple as possible use sizes that your lumber already comes in. I chose to make my coop floor 4x8 so one sheet of plywood would cover the floor and thus giving me 32 square feet for 8 chickens. Less cutting. For me, out of all the tools I have learned to use the circular saw is the scariest to use so I try to avoid cutting wide pieces of lumber when I can. I did not calculate the nest boxes into the floor space.

    I built my nest boxes with a side flip down door. Easier to access for shorty's like myself and less chance for rain to get in. There are pictures on my thread and I believe there is a link to how to build them. If not I'll try to find the link for you. Look under my "technical coop building" thread.

    As far as the gutter goes on the garden coop it doesn't look like there is a solid place to mount it. There is on the wichita. I never know if this is called soffit or fascia. Whatever it is, its a flat board that you could easily attach a gutter too. The poly carb roof looks like it hangs way over so not sure how you would do this.

    My land is also not level and I have to be honest, its a pain in the you know what. I used cinderblocks and pavers to make it level to start. Having things level, square and plumb will save you many, many, many headaches as you get further along in your build. I would recommend building it level and adding fill.

    I have a big door into the run and a big door on the front. My reason is I'm short and I know I will not be able to reach all corners of my coop with just one access door. I know, I know I will be using a rake or something but still. Also, I might do deep litter method and then I could use the door on the run side to just scoop all the stuff from inside the coop into the run directly. I'm not sure Im going to do deep litter but I made my coop to accomadate this in case. ie: raise your pop door and nest boxes 6 to 9" above floor for deep litter.

    The cheapest place for hardware cloth that I found was Amazon. Especially if you have prime and get free shipping.
     
  6. fightingbunny

    fightingbunny Chillin' With My Peeps

    162
    59
    91
    Aug 9, 2016
    Maryland
    I saw a picture of someone with a Garden Coop that had a gutter on there, but the angle wasn't right to see how it was done. Another question to ask the person providing plans!
     
  7. Knoble Chickens

    Knoble Chickens Out Of The Brooder

    141
    23
    48
    Feb 17, 2017
    Spanaway WA
    A gutter can be as simple as a piece of plastic pipe cut in half long ways. Vinyl gutter is cheap, for about $20 you can get everything you need for a 10 or 12ft run. I have a plan to add a gutter to the run I am in the process of building. It will have a downspout to a covered bucket feeding chicken nipples or cups, with a overflow directed to a "drain field".
     
  8. fightingbunny

    fightingbunny Chillin' With My Peeps

    162
    59
    91
    Aug 9, 2016
    Maryland
    What I am failing at understanding is how gutters are actually attached. What do I need to add to the edge of my coop/roof to attach to?
     
  9. fightingbunny

    fightingbunny Chillin' With My Peeps

    162
    59
    91
    Aug 9, 2016
    Maryland
    So this is something like what I am thinking of doing, minus the bees part :)

    http://www.thegardencoop.com/blog/2016/01/25/keeping-bees-with-chickens/

    I will also have a step down of about a foot between the two sections. I like the idea of two sections so that I can shoo the chickens into one side while I am doing anything like cleaning or changing decorations. I seriously get upset when they fly up around my face and land on my head/shoulders or when they take a peck at my eyes. I know that sounds cowardly, but I am pretty new to chickens :)

    This link also shows black hardware cloth which I haven't seen before. Has anyone used that?

    Jenn
     
  10. Knoble Chickens

    Knoble Chickens Out Of The Brooder

    141
    23
    48
    Feb 17, 2017
    Spanaway WA
    One way is a fascia board. You may need to use brackets attached to the board made for the particular gutter in question. That is about 98% of all installations on regular buildings. Fascia boards are usually nailed to the ends of the rafters. You could nail to the ends of the rafters themselves, or add wood to make something to attach to if needed. My run will have a simple sheet metal roof, and the wood underneath is running the wrong way to attach a gutter directly to the rafter ends. I will be making custom brackets to attach them.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by