Genetic Inheritance Questions

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by camby, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. camby

    camby Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok, this may have been posted before but I couldn't find it and sorry but I just can't read through 100's of posts looking for certain terms. My questions are do most of the color traits and a few of the "coat" traits follow simple mendelian results? Is there a list somewhere that advises if traits are simple recessive, co dominate, dominate and so on. An example is the mottle trait for instance. If a mottled is bred to a blue for example, then a pair of the babies are bred back together, is the mottled trait recovered as a simple recessive trait?

    Thank you in advance for educated/experienced responses.

    dc
     
  2. loveourbirds

    loveourbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    different traits breed differently, some are by sex - for instance the barring gene - 2 are required for barring in females, only 1 will make barred males.

    some genes mute or mutate certain colors or traits, creating a whole new effect in coloration.

    someone somewhere has made a table, but its best to decide what you want to create and go from there.

    do you have something in mind?
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2013
  3. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Barring is dominant, if present it will show. Females have only one copy, males can have one or two. The barring looks the same on females and males with one copy. Males with two copies have wider white bars. Same with other sex-linked genes, males can have two copies of the gene, females only one. In sex-linked recessives (choc, for example), it will not show on males with only one copy, but if a female has the gene, it will show.

    http://www.edelras.nl/chickengenetics/mutations1.html is an excellent resource, Genetics of Chickencolors and Basics is a bit less intimidating for starting to learn the genetics of chickens.

    While mottling is recessive, it can show to some extent in juvenile plumage, sometimes lasting a year or even a bit longer, but it will disappear as the bird ages when only one copy is present. Other recessive genes such as lav or choc do not have any affect or appearance when present in only one copy.

    Comb genes are about the only co-dominant genes in chickens.
     
  4. camby

    camby Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you both for the reply. It will take time but I will get there I guess. I breed snakes also and really understand their genetics and combinations of different traits, but the language of chicken genetics and snake genetics is not the same.

    Mainly I had three questions I had in mind. If my Gold Laced Cochin roo cross to my Blue Cochin hen, then what is the outcome and can the gold laced be recovered in f2 breedings. Same questions for the following two crosses. Buff Laced Brahma x Gold laced, what is the outcome and can both traits be recovered in the f2 breedings (is buff laced and gold laced simple recessive and do they overlay or mute one another).

    Thanks again

    dc
     
  5. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    gold laced x blue = blue or black F1

    gold laced x F1 black female = BC1 some dark gold laced

    gold laced x BC1 female = some gold laced birds


    black tailed single lacing is a polygenic trait= homozygous columbian. homozygous pattern, homozygous melanotic and homozygous brown

    buff laced x gold laced = gold laced

    Tim
     
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  6. loveourbirds

    loveourbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    the only brahmas i know about breeding are light LOL, i do have some buff laced chicks but havent researched them yet.

    my advice, if your wanting to breed them is to get a matching mate. in showing type is more important than color, but most experienced breeders work a lifetime on color and never get it perfected. i work with OEGB's and sometimes colorations will drive you nuts. the blue colors may fade your blacks for years, or possibly even mottle the lacing.

    sonoran silkies, when crossing colors the barring gene can become a sex linking gene. females require 2 barring genes to be barred, males only need one. ideal white leghorns carries a recessive barring gene that drives people nuts all the time, they think white to white makes white- in this case it doesnt work. black sex links are also made this way, and i believe its part of the development of california gray leghorns.
     
  7. loveourbirds

    loveourbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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  8. camby

    camby Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for the information. Great post and very helpful to me.

    dc
     
  9. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Barring cannot "become" a sex-linked gene, it IS one. Female birds have only one copy of sex-linked genes. Their alternative chromosome is the W chromosome, which does not have a space for sex-linked genes. Thus they can be B/- (barred) or b+/- (not barred). If they have two barring genes, they are male, as they have two Z chromosomes. Males can be B/B (barred with wider white bars), B/b+ (barring is the same as female barring) or b+/b+ (not-barred).

    There is no recessive barring gene, Dominant white birds tend to have multiple dilution genes bred into them. Barring, blue and silver are common. They help turn a dominant white bird a solid white, which it is often not without the addition of genes that dilute or remove colour. Black sex-links are bred from a barred mother and a non-barred father. The male chicks will all receive a copy of barring from the mother, the girls will receive the W-chromosomes absence of a place for a second copy of any sex-linked genes. California greys have a different allele of the same barring gene (B^Sd) that dilutes as well as creates a white bar.
     
  10. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Genetics 101

    The word you are wanting is not recessive but hypostatic. One allele is recessive to another allele. Genes are either hypostatic or epistatic . One gene hides another genes expression. The gene's expression that is being hidden is hypostatic to the another genes expression. The gene that is hiding the expression of the other gene is epistatic to the hidden gene.

    Dominant white is epistaic to the barring gene. The barring gene is hypostatic to the dominant white gene.

    Ideals white only white leghorns carry two dominant white genes while the ideal 236 is a hybrid white leghorn that normally only carries one dominant white gene.

    I have not analyzed the genotype of the california white. ?????????????

    Tim
     

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