Getting the flock out of here - a diary of a crazy chicken man

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by ozexpat, Dec 25, 2012.

  1. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member Project Manager

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    OH NO DO not PLACE anything in my imagination NOT GOOD!
     
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  2. OffGridMAMA

    OffGridMAMA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    New pics of your test babies :) I have moved them out to the small run/coop and they have thrived with the dirt & sunshine. Still bringing them in at night though. They have feathered out nicely :)
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  3. ozexpat

    ozexpat CocoBeach Farm


    I have already seen hints oh your imagination Sally. I sm scared!!

    Work was interrupted by rains then the coconut tree lumberjack. We have three trees that ar a little code to the location of the new house we are building our workers as well as the third coop.

    I always watch in amazement as the guy fells the 80 to 120 foot tall top heavy trees right where he wants them. The lumber will go into the coops and more out buildings.
     
  4. ozexpat

    ozexpat CocoBeach Farm



    Wow!!

    They look great OGM!

    Most of the eggs you donated to the cause are progressing on day 14. As you mentioned when I picked them up that some were a week old. Some of those did not do so well but the rest are great. I cant wait till I see them hatch.
     
  5. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member Project Manager

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  6. ozexpat

    ozexpat CocoBeach Farm

    Yesterday evening I went to my Lions Club meeting but could not get onto the internet. WiFi was down. This is not unusual. Its 715 am here and I normally have reliable but slow internet at home until 9 am. So here is a looong post.

    I am pleasantly surprised in your interest in my adventure. As an Australian, I went to the USA for a year on a whim. That was 1989 and essentially I have lived there ever since. After meeting my wife, a fellow nurse at a hospital in Los Angeles we were married in 1995. Our quest to have kids is a whole other story but it ended with us renovating an old run down beach house that we bought with a hectare of land in the Philippines, then moving over here to adopt. The two year process has turned into a five year process so I had to go back to the USA to work while my wife stays in the Philippines as we claw our way through the court process to make Antonia and Lorenzo legally ours.

    The Philippines is an amazing place that I truly love. Despite corruption and poverty, the people are happy, friendly and industrious. They make great sacrifices for their families by heading off alone to work for often lower-than-market salaries in order to remit money home. If housekeeping and construction would stop in the USA without the Mexican, then shipping, home care and healthcare worldwide would grind to a halt without the Filipino. In Spain, the upper echelon doesn’t brag that they , have a maid; they brag that they have a Filipina.

    The Philippines has modern cities with modern malls that put those in the west to shame – but that’s not where we live. Our place is very provincial. The landscape of the province of Negros Oriental is dominated by the sugar industry. Hacienderos own the land. Obreros work the land. The disparity is unfathomable to an outsider but this almost feudal system works. The workers live in barrios on the land of the owner. Most hacienderos take responsibility for their employees from womb to tomb with generations of obreros working for generations of hacienderos. They will sponsor the obrero’s child through school, and once they have a college degree and an overseas job, the child then provides for the younger siblings education. Our area is slowly being dotted with new houses for families provided through this mechanism. My father-in-law’s family started a small school many years ago that has grown into a college. The family foundation has taken a life of its own a with scores of scholarships provided by the family and hundreds more by the alma mata scholarship recipients. When cane prices are high, the province flourishes. Construction brings jobs while vehicle and commodity sales increase the flow of money in the towns and cities.

    Those outside the sugar farm system eek out a living working in markets, farming small rice plots and fishing. Unemployment is in excess of 25%. With poverty comes issues. Day work dries up in July and does not resume until September. It is during this time that I lose, among other things, chickens. People are hungry. I am not going to begrudge somebody for making chicken soup from a wandering chicken. Like those of you that lose poultry from other reasons, I have to prevent losses where I can and factor into production, those I can’t.
    So now I have written a prologue that is way too long I will try to load some pics.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2013
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  7. ozexpat

    ozexpat CocoBeach Farm

    Ay Ambot! (a local non-swearing term of exasperation)

    I cannot load photos.

    Sorry. I will try tomorrow.
     
  8. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member Project Manager

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    [​IMG] <insert tapping fingers here>
     
  9. ozexpat

    ozexpat CocoBeach Farm

    Its lunch time on a wednesday. My wife took our son to the doc following s persistent fever for five days. She is drawing blood to rule out dengue fever but its probably just a virus that kids just transmit to each other. Still you can never be sure in the tropics.

    I am building the coop. The rafters are going up for the roof. I have been unable to buy the bamboo for the walls. The guy I ordered 300 lengths from has not come through. I have switched to using the scrap wood with the skin still on it. My father in law has on going construction at his day resort next door and harvested loads of hardwood and milled it on site. The coop will look like a tropical log cabin.

    With Lorenzo's fever and the delays in the coop because of the rain, we will head off to Dumaguete and the copra mill tomorrow.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2013
  10. gabrielle1976

    gabrielle1976 Overrun With Chickens

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    I hope your son gets well very soon.
     

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