Goose Egg in Incubator Question

Discussion in 'Geese' started by goosemama, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. goosemama

    goosemama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 11, 2009
    Forestville, New York
    Put 3 goose eggs (purchased) in our Bator Monday night. Two of three were really dirty but I just wiped them with a warm damp paper towel. None of the dirt or stains came off - didn't want to wash them so put them in the Bator. Two days later one of the eggs has what appears to be pimples on the shell. Thought it was moisture but they are hard granules. Does anyone know what this is? I have humidity at 55 - 60% and spray the eggs with room temp water as the seller advised about 3 times a day when I turn them.
     
  2. cracking up

    cracking up Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 29, 2009
    So Cal
    Your egg with the granules sounds like it's weeping. I usually try to leave eggs in as long as possible if I'm not sure about them but I throw out weepers.
     
  3. goosedragon

    goosedragon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2009
    Central NC
    Quote:Carefully snif the egg, a 'weeping' egg will stink. Some birds do leave granuals on the shell. It is a fault in the last step of the egg forming process just like but opposite of birds that produce thin shelled eggs.~gd
     
  4. goosemama

    goosemama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 11, 2009
    Forestville, New York
    Hi Goose Dragon,
    I'm afraid to sniff it!!!!! two were laid in the horse barn and they stink already. Everytime I open the lid of the Incubator there is a real barn smell and anyone nearby says "whew!!!". Not sure if I would smell rotten egg or barn newey!
     
  5. countrychix

    countrychix Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 18, 2010
    Frewsburg, NY
    I dry hatched my goose eggs and only sprayed them once a day w/warm water. The humidity at the time was running around 30% (in the bator) but it was earlier in the spring when the outside humidity was lower also. I only increased the humidity in the bator once the goslings had externally pipped. I was very pleased with the results. I don't know what the pimples are. I've had weeping chicken eggs before but the moisture droplets would wipe right off, not that I kept them as at that point as they are definitely no good.
     
  6. goosemama

    goosemama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 11, 2009
    Forestville, New York
    OK I smelled it and it doesn't smell of rotten egg but definitely odorous - worse than the other two - almost like a strong urine/vinegar smell. Oh it was nasty.
     
  7. goosedragon

    goosedragon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2009
    Central NC
    Quote:Do I need to tell you to toss it? If it explodes in your bator it might kill the other 2 eggs! ~gd
     
  8. goosemama

    goosemama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 11, 2009
    Forestville, New York
    Yes you do!!!! I have been looking for these eggs for so long - and now a 2nd is weeping a jelly like substance on it. Oh Rats looks like I am going to lose two of them. By the way, didn't get your post about the water drunkedness until late last night - for some reason the prompt to click on to BYCF to read a new post didn't arrive until after you privately e-mailed me. That is great advice and I hope other gosling owners read about the "water drunkedness" and not let their goslings get dehydrated. You'd think that info would be in a goose raising book somewhere!
     
  9. goosedragon

    goosedragon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2009
    Central NC
    Your eggs, your choise, but don't say you were not warned if they explode.
    most books will tell you not to let goslings or ducklings to get dehydrated.
    One more time I will tell the board the procedure that I use when i suspect they might be dehydrated like when I check their water and find that the little buggers have dumped all three water bowls. Put down fresh water if they fight for it or guzzle it down I take it away from them and let each bird get a decent but not huge drink. If they show no signs of drunken behavior i repeat the whole process in 15-20 minutes. If some act drunk but others don't I start with the normal birds and let the drunks have much smaller or no drink at all. The theory is to let them process the water they already have in their bellies. Let the belly send the message to the brain that it finally got some water and let the brain ease off on the gulping behavor. Don't be suprized if the drunks vomit that is one way to get excess water out of the system. let them have a little drink to wash out their mouth and bills. If the dehydration or rehydration was severe you may still lose a few. BTW I think they do the same thing for humans except they tend to use IVs where possible for better control of the fluid,~gd
     
  10. goosemama

    goosemama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 11, 2009
    Forestville, New York
    I was only kidding when I replied yes to "do I have to tell you to toss them?" - Apparently my joke fell flat! I did put the two weeping ones in a ziplock bag. When I tapped them with a spoon the one "popped" so it was building up gas. They both had pale lemon yellow fluid that gushed out. Don't think they were even fertile. It was a risky purchase not knowing the seller or how long she had them laying around. Have found another lady from E-Bay who has good reviews from other buyers who I have also talked with about her eggs. Her Pilgrims laid until late June last year and are still laying eggs so am going to try again with 3 more eggs. Its more of a risk to hatch shipped eggs I know, but if I could hatch even one out of the three I would be happy.
     

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