Goose Incubation & Hatching Guide - Completed!!!!

Discussion in 'Geese' started by pete55, Apr 24, 2011.

  1. Marty1876

    Marty1876 Hi Everyone!

    Pete, using your method again this year. Used it last year to hatch those sweet Buff Dewlap Toulouse, some of which I lost to dog attack. Working hard to repopulate this year from my remaining trio.

    THANKS AGAIN for this wonder thread!
     
  2. Jotaylor

    Jotaylor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Would/could a 1 week old goose kill a baby chick? I checked on the babies last night everything was fine, then this morning the chick was dead [​IMG] its nose was kind of bloody and so is the gooses nose. I wonder what happened?
     
  3. fire pirate

    fire pirate Out Of The Brooder

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    I usually keep diffrent species seperate dut to the size diffrence alone. Even same species like chickens just being 2 or 3 weeks older than a newborn cam do some damage to fragile newborns. I leatned the hard way :( sorry for your baby chickie.
     
  4. Jotaylor

    Jotaylor Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They hatched the same day and had always been together, now the goose is alone because I am afraid to put it with my bigger babies.
     
  5. pete55

    pete55 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi Marty

    Thanks again for the kind words.

    I really hope you get some lovely goslings after that terrible accident last year. You really deserve an exceptional good run of luck.

    We too are keeping quiet as we hope for our first Buffs from our Dewlux line!!!

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  6. Marty1876

    Marty1876 Hi Everyone!

    Oh, I hope they do really great for you. Those will be so amazing, it will be hard to wait for them to develope! I love my dewlap toulose very much, they are the grand beauties of our garden. My fleet of grass schooners!
     
  7. pete55

    pete55 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well I'll cross everything and just hope at the moment [​IMG]
     
  8. backwards pipped gosling:
    Hes still not out, its been 14 hours since i noticed the pip this morning. I dont know when exactly he pipped... Hes not making
    two much noise he is moving his bill in and out of the hole. He looked weak so i tried
    what Pete's hatching guide said. I checked for blood vessels with the candler, there werent any that i saw. So i broke a few pieces off and there was a little blood so i put him back in the hatcher. I know that it takes 12-24 hours from pip to hatch but he looked weak. I dont want to lose him in the shell. If hes strong enough to hold his breath and pip through that tough shell on the wrong end then i want to save him. I'll check him every hour tonight and keep an eye on him. Is there anything else i can do?? I dont want him to die.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2013
  9. pete55

    pete55 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Firstly you need to keep this egg in lockdown conditions with a high humidity and hopefully you'll be able to monitor it there.

    These goslings are not able to internally pip and this stage is bypassed as they go straight to external pipping. They usually need at least 24 to 36 hours after external pipping before they're ready to hatch. Even normal positioned goslings appear weak after external pipping and its usually 12 to 24 hours before they become more active with peeping and more vigorous movement.

    You simply cannot rush this and the slight bleed immediately tells you that the blood vessels remain active and the yolk sac has not been absorbed into the abdomen. The most intervention is just checking the gosling has a clear air hole which is not 'glued' up with excess albumen/waste products.

    When you choose to assist try to be guided by behaviour and you'll need a bright pen torch so you can try and candle the inside of the shell to search for vessels. If you proceed to help then the key is work very slowly and concentrate on simply work on enlarging the pip area more and more.

    Usually we proceed in this way around the 30 hour post external pip time. The goal being to remove just enough shell to be able to free the head only. Once the head is free then you should be able to see right down into the remainder of the egg. if you've gone in too early and there's still blood vessels and then simply lay the egg on clean gauze with the gosling's head out and leave to rest.


    Best of luck

    Pete
     
  10. pete55

    pete55 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just a tip for everyone but I do have more Incubation related threads and articles on the Sebastopol Geese Lovers Forum.

    This includes details of our NEW REVISED INCUBATION TECHNIQUES.

    I have done this since some of my work was reproduced on BYC on another forum without my permission although I was credited. After I'd shared the information freely I found this very rude and almost a form of plagiarism before the work was published. I'm sure you understand and on the SGL Forum I have better control of our work.

    Maybe I should take up the issue with the offending member and administrators or perhaps its too petty. I just get angry that there was no request for permission or credit to the author (myself) only a link to this thread but the diagrams and text is directly from this thread. Here's a screen capture to show you;

    [​IMG]


    Membership is free and even if you don't keep Sebastopol Geese you'd still be welcome. If you visit the CottageRose's Website for Sebastopols you'll find the relevant link there.

    I'm not sure is the Moderators on this forum would find it acceptable to post a direct link here???????
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2013

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