Group Research Project

briefvisit

Songster
7 Years
Nov 9, 2013
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Females vocalise in the early-morning hours. I guess it's territorial.

And over time, I've learned that different females have distinctive 'signatures' to their booms. There's the number of booms, from about six to sixteen. Some females do a 'boo-boom' -- a 'double boom.' Mrs. Tooshtoosh is unique, with a pause in her string.

But over twelve years, we've only had the privilege of auditing six or eight females thus. (Sometimes only forty yards from my bedroom window.)

So, would anyone like to help with actual research? Do you have a female who vocalises in the early a.m.? If so, can you describe her signature? How many booms? Other detail?

SE
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Jul 31, 2018
17,014
130,684
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Catalonia, Spain
My Coop
My Coop
Females vocalise in the early-morning hours. I guess it's territorial.

And over time, I've learned that different females have distinctive 'signatures' to their booms. There's the number of booms, from about six to sixteen. Some females do a 'boo-boom' -- a 'double boom.' Mrs. Tooshtoosh is unique, with a pause in her string.

But over twelve years, we've only had the privilege of auditing six or eight females thus. (Sometimes only forty yards from my bedroom window.)

So, would anyone like to help with actual research? Do you have a female who vocalises in the early a.m.? If so, can you describe her signature? How many booms? Other detail?

SE
Booms are not the greatest describer of chicken calls.:D
May I suggest that you make some recordings and detail the circumstances under which the recordings were made.
I've got hours of recorded chicken talk recorded in my attempts to accurately identify various calls. If one accepts that each hen has a different voice and that the circumstances of perceived similarities in the calls may determine a different meaning; think about inflections and accents in human vocal communication and it shouldn't take long to realize that 'boom' isn't going to facilitate a greater understanding.:)
There is currently some research into chicken sounds. I've got 36 separate calls now, 23 of which I'm fairly confident in their meaning.
It's a fascinating topic which has got to the point with some researches where discussion is now veering towards whether chickens have a 'proper' language as defined in human terms.
 

Cyprus

Master of the 'never give up' attitude
Jan 19, 2018
16,113
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Booms are not the greatest describer of chicken calls.:D
May I suggest that you make some recordings and detail the circumstances under which the recordings were made.
I've got hours of recorded chicken talk recorded in my attempts to accurately identify various calls. If one accepts that each hen has a different voice and that the circumstances of perceived similarities in the calls may determine a different meaning; think about inflections and accents in human vocal communication and it shouldn't take long to realize that 'boom' isn't going to facilitate a greater understanding.:)
There is currently some research into chicken sounds. I've got 36 separate calls now, 23 of which I'm fairly confident in their meaning.
It's a fascinating topic which has got to the point with some researches where discussion is now veering towards whether chickens have a 'proper' language as defined in human terms.
Shad, this thread is under the Ostriches, Emus and Rheas forum.

I can say with great confidence that the OP is not talking about chickens. Rather, I'm pretty sure this is about Ostriches.
 

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