Growing fodder for chickens

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by pawtraitart, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. pawtraitart

    pawtraitart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A cooler temperature is ideal. If it's too warm, then mold gets a boost. An average of 60 degrees F seems to be perfect according to my tests. Hope that helps. :)
     
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  2. DMRippy

    DMRippy Pallet Queen Premium Member

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    It dips in the 40's here most every night. Good sleeping but might get too cool for fodder. I don't have a basement to keep them more constant temps. I can keep them near my brooder boxes to keep them warmer at night. I just need to do some planning.
     
  3. pawtraitart

    pawtraitart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would go ahead and try them at 40. It might still work. If not, a regular 60 watt incandescent light bulb nearby might heat it up enough. If you can place your fodder trays in a closet or cabinet with a light bulb in it that should do the trick as well. Good luck. :)
     
  4. DMRippy

    DMRippy Pallet Queen Premium Member

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    [​IMG] Will do!
     
  5. Daloorashens

    Daloorashens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is a good way to explain it!

    My question now... Do you only feed fodder, then? in addition to what you stated above?
     
  6. QuartzRidgeRanch

    QuartzRidgeRanch Out Of The Brooder

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    For my chickens they get fodder morning and evening and then the milk soaked scratch grains for a treat. For my American Guinea Hogs they get mostly fodder, some hay and a little bit of milk and scratch grains as a treat. They are plump but not overly fat. My horse gets fodder and some hay. I don't buy the expensive alfalfa or orchard grass because they get most of their nutrients from the fodder. It is to keep the horse busy and it is recommended to have some leafy, dry hay to move the fodder through their system. Same with the dairy goats, they get fodder and hay. When they are in milk or a month before they kid we give them dairy pellets. My Pilgrim Geese eat just barley and my muscovies eat the barley and they they get to forage for food. So far everyone is a healthy weight and happy. No one seems like they are starving even though it seems like i am feeding them so little. I have found throwing in the hay helps give them something to do :)
     
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  7. Daloorashens

    Daloorashens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    HAve you done a cost comparison with the fodder?? Pound for pound wise... Just curious...
     
  8. kreagerm

    kreagerm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Making plans of my own to take on a fodder project, thanks for all the great information!!!!
     
  9. greenhorn

    greenhorn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow, 40 dollars a ton! That's some inexpensive feed right there.
     
  10. melwynnd

    melwynnd Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi Guys,

    Sorry for the absence, spent the last week getting ready for a Sustainability festival nearby. My living room was full of Fodder!!

    For those of you considering a greenhouse, I would recommend a small, well insulated shed with a window instead. Fodder doesn't need much light. What it DOES need is constant temperatures. It's not going to do much at all at 40 degrees. Even if it heats up to 70 during the day, dropping back down to 40 is going to slow the growth to a crawl. A greenhouse heats up during the day, but it's really hard to keep warm at night.

    As for comparative price, that depends on the price of your seed. I buy my wheat for $9.60 per pound. I get about 6 pounds of Fodder per pound of wheat. This so it runs just over $.03 a pound or $64 a ton. Not too bad for such high quality feed.

    Sherry

    I finally got some decent picture of the 12 tray system. There's on of both systems together on my website Gallery at www.half-pinthomestead.com

    [​IMG]
     
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