1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Growing fodder for chickens

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by pawtraitart, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. MarineCorpFarmr

    MarineCorpFarmr Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,767
    34
    153
    Mar 9, 2012
    AL/TN Stateline
    My Coop
    lol Lacy you beat me to it :p
     
  2. Kassaundra

    Kassaundra Sonic screwdrivers are cool!

    16,436
    1,600
    421
    Sep 1, 2010
    Henryetta
    sprouts just have roots and a tiny bit of leaf stem growing but no green in it (usually has not had any sun or light exposure), fodder has been growing a couple of days longer and exposed to ambiant or sun light depending on your set up and has green leaves.

    Fodder (as talked about in this thread) is basically older sprouts. But also can refer to a grain being grown outside in the ground and fed out or grazed in the grass stage rather then all the way to seed or hay.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2012
  3. pawtraitart

    pawtraitart Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,725
    236
    218
    May 30, 2007
    Idaho
  4. mg15

    mg15 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,267
    86
    178
    Aug 22, 2012
    HI, thanks,
    I think the green leafed fodder would be more nutritious,
    is this true?
    mg
     
  5. Kassaundra

    Kassaundra Sonic screwdrivers are cool!

    16,436
    1,600
    421
    Sep 1, 2010
    Henryetta
    That is one of the $64,000 questions. [​IMG] The act of sprouting (applicable to both sprouts and fodder as both are sprouted) changes the bioavailability of the nutrients locked in the dry grain that are not available to the animal for digestion b/c of "antinutrients". However the fodder has chloriphyll not in the sprout, and more volume. I personally think both are comparible, and very healthy for your chickens it just depends on what is feasable for you to do.
     
  6. Cynthia12

    Cynthia12 Always Grateful Premium Member

    30,542
    5,078
    596
    Apr 11, 2010
    Utah
    [​IMG]
    Ok, picture, I've been taking my fodder out when it hits this size..this is the third that
    has gone out. The first time I threw on down, they all scattered like the sky was falling.
    Then they discovered it was food. With two feet of snow out there, they are liking it
    better every day. They leave the roots. All else gets eaten. :))
     
  7. pawtraitart

    pawtraitart Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,725
    236
    218
    May 30, 2007
    Idaho
    Looks great!
     
  8. jchny2000

    jchny2000 Bottle calves Premium Member

    9,141
    1,512
    366
    Jun 30, 2012
    Pendleton, Indiana, USA
    ok thanks! i think my feed mill has them, am going up this week.
     
  9. groverlvchx

    groverlvchx Chillin' With My Peeps

    232
    16
    88
    Oct 14, 2012
    Minnesota
    I'm so excited! My rye is starting to sprout
    [​IMG]
    This is after 12 hours of soaking and 36 hours covered in a strainer. Tonight I will drill holes in the bottom of my plastic bin and move them. It will be fun watching them grow! I will also rinse another batch to start sprouting. I plan to rotate four batches to start, feeding 1/2 biscuit daily. If this is successful I'll increase my fodder production as my flock increases. Right now I only have 17 chickens.
    [​IMG]
    draining (I cover this with a plate. I hear that makes it think there's dirt on top. [​IMG])
    See the bins next to the sprouting rye? That's the next step in my fodder system. So excited!! [​IMG]

    I'll keep you posted!
    Carol
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by