Guinea won’t walk😔

R2elk

Magical, perfect creature
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Feb 24, 2013
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Natrona County, Wyoming
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Thank you for the thread referral. I know it’s not an egg issue at all. She’s still laying normal eggs daily. I will offer her calcium though. I saw that mentioned in the post and haven’t given any to my guineas in a couple months. She’s still eating, drinking, and acting normal. She even tried to get up a couple times. I’m thinking it must be a sprain or something of that nature.
I really hope she will fully recover with time.
If your hens are laying eggs, you must offer them oyster shell free choice. Guinea hens are susceptible to calcium deficiency and will lose motor control if they are deficient enough. They can seem fine but will not be able to walk at first which then can develop into a failure to be able to stand.
 

My2butterflies

Songster
Apr 14, 2020
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Minnesota
If your hens are laying eggs, you must offer them oyster shell free choice. Guinea hens are susceptible to calcium deficiency and will lose motor control if they are deficient enough. They can seem fine but will not be able to walk at first which then can develop into a failure to be able to stand.
Well it sounds like that might be what’s going on here then:( I hope it won’t be too late getting calcium to her now. And I’ll be sure to keep up with having it out for my girls.
I used to have it out all the time, but it seemed like their dish never emptied and I never put a new dish in the new coop. I will fix that right away!
 

R2elk

Magical, perfect creature
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Feb 24, 2013
21,334
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Natrona County, Wyoming
My Coop
Well it sounds like that might be what’s going on here then:( I hope it won’t be too late getting calcium to her now. And I’ll be sure to keep up with having it out for my girls.
I used to have it out all the time, but it seemed like their dish never emptied and I never put a new dish in the new coop. I will fix that right away!
I have a separate feeder for the oyster shell. Most of the guinea hens help themselves to it when needed. They don't touch it when it is not laying season. There is one hen that apparently does not eat the oyster shell from the feeder. Whenever I found her soft shell eggs, I scoop some oyster shell out and drop it on the ground below the feeder. Within a day or two she is back to laying normal eggs.
 

Sydney65

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Aug 2, 2019
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Thank you for the thread referral. I know it’s not an egg issue at all. She’s still laying normal eggs daily. I will offer her calcium though. I saw that mentioned in the post and haven’t given any to my guineas in a couple months. She’s still eating, drinking, and acting normal. She even tried to get up a couple times. I’m thinking it must be a sprain or something of that nature.
I really hope she will fully recover with time.
Have you been able to actual exam her feet? My little guy's buddy used to peck his foot incessantly. It was obviously painful at times, bc he'd just sit down and watch the others until I picked him up.
Not suggesting that's your exact scenario, but might be worth checking for cuts or bumblefoot, etc.?
 

My2butterflies

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Apr 14, 2020
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Minnesota
Have you been able to actual exam her feet? My little guy's buddy used to peck his foot incessantly. It was obviously painful at times, bc he'd just sit down and watch the others until I picked him up.
Not suggesting that's your exact scenario, but might be worth checking for cuts or bumblefoot, etc.?
I did. No cuts, scrapes, or breaks. No swelling either.
She did half stand up when I came out. But can’t hold too much weight before sitting down again. I think lack of calcium may have played a roll in making her weak. I’m just hoping the damage isn’t permanent.
 

BennieAnTheJets

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Mar 4, 2016
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I had made that mistake my first year and almost killed a hen

she could not stand either

calcium does not really dissolve in water, but I used some of the oyster shell rocks and dust and stirred it in some water and put it in her beak with a syringe - you got to be careful not to drown them - only a few drops at a time because their air intake is in their throat and when they panic they may inhale the liquid and that would be very bad

somehow I managed and got some white, cloudy water with calcium into her and she ended up fine and healthy again

but from what you say, the Guineas had a fright night and flew up, possibly hitting the ceiling? They can break their neck and die that way - I keep a low wattage red party bulb on at night as a night light because of the ceiling over their heads - wild Guineas don't have hard ceilings over their heads and tend to fly up when frightened even if they can't see anything at night

I hope your hen did not do any damage in her head that may affect her walking - I hope it is the calcium and she makes a full recovery!

the calcium deficiency effect may have gotten suddenly worse after a fright night with lots of muscle exertion that took her last reserves of usable calcium in the system so it could still be that - I hope
 
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My2butterflies

Songster
Apr 14, 2020
533
1,232
143
Minnesota
I had made that mistake my first year and almost killed a hen

she could not stand either

calcium does not really dissolve in water, but I used some of the oyster shell rocks and dust and stirred it in some water and put it in her beak with a syringe - you got to be careful not to drown them - only a few drops at a time because their air intake is in their throat and when they panic they may inhale the liquid and that would be very bad

somehow I managed and got some white, cloudy water with calcium into her and she ended up fine and healthy again

but from what you say, the Guineas had a fright night and flew up, possibly hitting the ceiling? They can break their neck and die that way - I keep a low wattage red party bulb on at night as a night light because of the ceiling over their heads - wild Guineas don't have hard ceilings over their heads and tend to fly up when frightened even if they can't see anything at night

I hope your hen did not do any damage in her head that may affect her walking - I hope it is the calcium and she makes a full recovery!

the calcium deficiency effect may have gotten suddenly worse after a fright night with lots of muscle exertion that took her last reserves of usable calcium in the system so it could still be that - I hope
Since my guineas can’t really “fly” I doubt they could reach the ceiling. Their coop is over 20ft tall. (Converted grain bin) Thank goodness or else I may have lost some or had more injured then just her.
I too hope it is just calcium and soft tissue related. She has been eating well and looks like she is eating the oyster shell I’ve been putting in her food.
 

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