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Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by SYLVIA STEVENSON, Jun 1, 2017.

  1. SYLVIA STEVENSON

    SYLVIA STEVENSON Just Hatched

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    Hi! I just jointed. Thanks for having me. I have been on this site many times and enjoy the review and information I find.
    I had chickens one time previously (bantam cochins). Then, I didn't have any for a long time. This past year I adopted two older hens, Penny (an Easter Egger) and Heney (a Cuckoo Marans). Penny is my cutest and best layer. Heney I find to be the sweetest. Then, in April I bought 6 leghorn chicks at Tractor Supply and then ordered 5 black australorps. Well, I am glad to have all of them. However, these are my issues. I understand my leghorns are supposed to be how they are (flighty) but the Australorps are also flighty but not as brave and friendly as the leghorns. I guess between not being able to spend as much time with them as I'd like and the Australorps brooding with the Leghorns, that's maybe what happened. But, they just don't seem like they ever were as gentle and friendly as the leghorn,s oddly enough, just naturally. So, the other issue is that now I have 5 leghorn roosters out of 6. I love my leghorn hen Rosie. She's flighty but friendly and can be mellow and sweet. Anyway, I will deal with my shy Australorps but I really need to get rid of 4 or 5 leghorn roosters. Does anyone in East Tennessee, around Johnson City, TN, need any roosters for ANY PURPOSE? I will give them to you.
    Thanks again for letting me join. :)
     
    Mace Gill likes this.
  2. Mace Gill

    Mace Gill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Welcome! Nice to see another user that goes by their name!

    Good luck with leghorn roosters, and as for the Aussies, nothing says 'trust' like mealworms ;)
     
  3. SYLVIA STEVENSON

    SYLVIA STEVENSON Just Hatched

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    They get tons of dried meal worms. It's just hard with them. They are so shy and the leghorns usually jump in front of them. Hey, thanks! I'm still happy to have them all. I just consider my small ones to be all like a bunch of Mediterranean breeds (think Australorps have one or two Mediterranean breeds in them anyway).
     
  4. Mace Gill

    Mace Gill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know it's tough, but try isolating one group from the other (not all day or anything, just for a little while) ... go up to the aussie group and offer mealworms to any willing to eat from your hand. As for their originals ... mostly orpington, a little RIR, but some mixed in their wouldn't surprise me!
     
  5. SYLVIA STEVENSON

    SYLVIA STEVENSON Just Hatched

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    I don't think I can do isolation but it sounds like great advice. At least I've learned some things for the future.
     
  6. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    When you rehome your extra roosters, your Australorps will have less reason to hang back. Did you get your birds from the same place? I ask because some folks raise birds with almost NO human contact and it takes a lot to win their trust.
     
  7. SYLVIA STEVENSON

    SYLVIA STEVENSON Just Hatched

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    No, unfortunately, I still have the leghorn roosters, who so far are okay but are always jumping in front of them for treats and such (though the others don't seem to care since they are timid). But, yes, it would be much easier without them since the hen is flighty but sweet and lets me pet her though she has a tendency to want to be lead hen among them. Yes, another person suggested separating them from the leghorns. It will be hard since they seem to all consider themselves family. Oh, leghorns were bought at Tractor Supply) who I think get theirs from Ideal maybe. And, the Australorps were ordered from Chickens for Backyards.
     
  8. SYLVIA STEVENSON

    SYLVIA STEVENSON Just Hatched

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    Thanks all for the suggestions! I see what would be best now. If hubbie will help me, we'll separate them...otherwise they will just be my wild bunch.
     
  9. theoldchick

    theoldchick The Chicken Whisperer

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    Hello! I think the differences in temperament is a matter of genetics. Some folks have flighty Leghorns and some folks have the easiest going Austalorps in the world. I think the breeder who selects calm, easy going birds will have calm, easy going chicks. High production facilities such as hatcheries have different selection methods and may sell birds that are flighty and fearful. Remember, keeping chickens as a backyard pet is relatively new and you will find a wide range of temperaments within any breed.
     
    SYLVIA STEVENSON likes this.
  10. SYLVIA STEVENSON

    SYLVIA STEVENSON Just Hatched

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    Yes, that's what I think too. I realize I didn't get to spend as much time with the babies as I'd like and the Leghorns influenced them. However, the Australorps just seemed to be extremely skittish from the start more than the Leghorns and without the boldness. So, really think some of it is just the strain of Australorps. I have read some others have experienced very timid Australorps.
     

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