HELP!!!.....CHICK MAKING NOISE....PIPPING FOR A LOOOONG TIME

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Chickensrock10110, Feb 22, 2009.

  1. Chickensrock10110

    Chickensrock10110 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 10, 2009
    Hawaii
    Well my seramas started to pip today......YESSS!!!!!

    BUT,

    How long does it take for them to come out??

    The first egg started to pip at around 8 am and it`s now 9pm HST.The eggs still did not make a difference from the time I saw them this morning.They do chirp once in a while but it was only a few times throughout the day.I REEEEEEEAAAAAAALLLLLLYYY wanna see them SOOOOON!I mean I`ve been waiting for 19 days and this is what they do to me....LOL.... This is my first hatch hope they make it OK.I`m worried sick, is this common?

    The temp is holding steady at 98 to 100* and the humidity is around 60 to 65%.

    Should I help them out?

    I forgot to say that I also have another batch in the incubatorthat is due in another two weeks and I turn the other batch daily about 3 times a day.Will this hurt the first batch? I heard that I should stop opening the bator after I stop turning the first batch?
     
  2. reveriereptile

    reveriereptile Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 17, 2008
    Northern NY
    I had the same problem happen. My first hatch was due when my father-in-law went on vacation. I walked by the bator and thought I heard something but just ignored it and a couple hours later I heard it again and checked since it was a couple days before the date we had down (accidently wrote the wrong date is why). I seen a little crack in the shell so I kept coming back checking it out and waiting. I also made peeping noises back and it would make more. They finally hatched out. That does seem like a long time though if they started around 8am. I'm not sure if you should help or not. We had some that we had to help on but it was due to them being in old incubators and the newer bators the little cousins that spend the night about every other week kept opening the bators. I think my father-in-law stops turning his eggs about a few days before they hatch. You might go into the chatroom and ask to maybe get a quicker response.

    Here's some information I got online that might help you out.
    "Eggs must incubate for 21 days. Eggs are rotated for the first 18 days, and lay still for the last 3 days. Perhaps the hen stops turning the eggs when she hears the chicks begin to peep inside the shell. When the eggs are resting during the final 3 days, listen. A little hole or crack in the shell will be the first indicator of hatching. The process may take a day or more. Be patient. You may be tempted to help the chick cast off the shell, but resist the urge. Rule one: Don’t touch the eggs during the hatching process. " from this site.... http://lhsfoss.org/fossweb/teachers/materials/plantanimal/chickeneggs.html
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2009
  3. jvls1942

    jvls1942 Overrun With Chickens

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    Oct 16, 2008
    wausau,wisconsin
    leave it alone.. it will come out when it is good and ready.. It has a lot of yolk to absorb, yet.. if you "help" you will most likely kill it. countless trillions of chickens have made it without your help..
     
  4. chilling in muscadine

    chilling in muscadine { I love being disfunctual }

    Jun 8, 2008
    muscadine, al.
    Yes definately leave it alone to hatch on its on. If the yolk sack isn't absorbed the chick may not make it. What I would be worried about is the second hatch. You had to raise the humity for the first hatch right? Hopefully you didn't hurt your second hatch by the higher humity or hurt your first hatch by opening the bator ferquently. When doing a stagared hatch its usually better to move the eggs on day 18 to a hatcher which is another bator with the humity raised thus not harming your later hatch. [​IMG] wishing you good luck on both hatches.
     
  5. FarmerDenise

    FarmerDenise Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 21, 2007
    Sonoma County
    I only have experience with a hen hatching the eggs. I think that the chicks peeping helps with the bonding process between chick and momma hen. My hens make little noises back to the peeping unhatched chicks. It can be a few days before they hatch.
     
  6. chookmadhubby

    chookmadhubby Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 22, 2009
    Lobethal
    I also vote to leave the hatching eggs alone, but will add that when you open the bator to turn the others give the hatching eggs a light misting of warm water to bring the humidity back up.
    Regards
    Trev
     
  7. NurseNettie

    NurseNettie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 13, 2008
    Northern Maine
    Quote:*** However, at this point, no turning---- they should be left and not turn the last 3 days [​IMG] NO bator opening!!!! Time to sit on your hands--- opening now will lower the temp and delay things [​IMG]
     
  8. chilling in muscadine

    chilling in muscadine { I love being disfunctual }

    Jun 8, 2008
    muscadine, al.
    You can cheep to your pipping eggs and they will respond. This also encourages them. You have to stop and think its a hard job for that little chick to break out of the egg and they have to rest. It can take up to 24 hours or more I would think from pipping to zipping.
     
  9. chilling in muscadine

    chilling in muscadine { I love being disfunctual }

    Jun 8, 2008
    muscadine, al.
    Quote:*** However, at this point, no turning---- they should be left and not turn the last 3 days [​IMG] NO bator opening!!!! Time to sit on your hands--- opening now will lower the temp and delay things [​IMG]

    The OP is working with a stagared hatch so they are turning the second hatch due later.
     
  10. jvls1942

    jvls1942 Overrun With Chickens

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    wausau,wisconsin
    Quote:temporarily raising the humidity whouldn't hurt the later hatch, just let the humidity go down again..
     

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