Help! I'm new!

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by amandarey20, Jun 13, 2010.

  1. amandarey20

    amandarey20 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 13, 2010
    Texas
    I am researching raising chickens. About to start building a coop. I have yet to find anywhere that tells me what the chickens eat as food, not as a treat or anything. Help? Also any tips or advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Ms.FuzzyButts

    Ms.FuzzyButts Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 5, 2009
    North Alabama
    [​IMG]
    As a short and simple answer, if they are babies, then you need to feed them Chick Starter. If they are old enough to lay, you need to feed them layer pellet. Layer pellet comes in several different ranges of protein. Opinions differ on what percentage is best. But I buy anywhere from an 18% to a 22%. Depends on what my feed store has at the time. Hope this helps you!
     
  3. FarmerJamie

    FarmerJamie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 21, 2010
    [​IMG] Hello from NE Ohio
     
  4. amandarey20

    amandarey20 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 13, 2010
    Texas
    That helps alot. Also one more big concern. I am smack dab in the middle of Texas. Is the heat going to bother them? Seeing as it does get around 105 or higher in the heat of summer.
     
  5. Rte.66_chicks

    Rte.66_chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 22, 2008
    Kingman, AZ
    As long as they have well-ventilated shade, they should be fine. BTW, [​IMG]
     
  6. herefordlovinglady

    herefordlovinglady It Is What It Is

    Jun 23, 2009
    Georgia
    Rte.66_chicks :

    As long as they have well-ventilated shade, they should be fine. BTW, [​IMG]

    and PLENTY of FRESH WATER...

    eta: [​IMG] and [​IMG] from Georgia​
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2010
  7. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Jun 1, 2009
    Ohio
    I found this sometime ago for someone on here and thought it might help you out also.
    [​IMG]

    What you could also do and it will eliminate the hassle of when to switch feeds is just feed them a good game bird feed that is right around 20% protein.
    I and a lot of people have switched to a game bird feed and really like the results that it has on the birds and also not having to have 3 or 4 different types of feed sitting around for different ages of birds.

    Chris
     
  8. amandarey20

    amandarey20 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 13, 2010
    Texas
    I just realized I have NO idea how much to feed. The way it looks is ill probably have 2-3 baby chicks. Most likely rhode island reds. How much should I feed while they are babies, and how many treats and when they are adults? Also when do they start laying?
     
  9. MissJenny

    MissJenny Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 11, 2009
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Hi there and [​IMG].

    I've always kept a full feeder in with them to eat when they want. I fill it each morning and clean out wood chips that they kick into it sporadically throughout the day. Recently I attended a seminar that said their treats should be no more than 10% of their diet to maintain appropriate nutrition.

    More importantly make sure they have clean fresh water always available. Some people use nipple waterers (like a hamster bottle.) Others have the water container suspended from the ceiling of the coop or from the mesh of their outdoor run. Or raised on bricks or blocks of wood -- all these methods keep the water off the ground and less likely to get muddied or pooped in.

    One thing you can do when they are somewhat bigger is to offer them a pan of shallow water -- they seem to like to walk through and cool their feet. Another cooling method is to fill plastic pop bottles with water and freeze them. Once frozen just lay them about the run area -- the hens will huddle around them to keep cool. If you have electricity available you can certainly suspend a fan over them.

    Here in Ohio temperatures rarely reach 105 -- but the humidity is always 70% or more. Hot doesn't begin to cover it.

    The very most important thing to know is that should you acquire more chicks from even the most pristine situation, the MUST be quarantined for 30 days prior to being introduced to your established flock. Nothing wipes out a flock faster than one lapse in judgement.

    And so, do we get pictures when you get your chicks? We like pictures.

    Good to meet you -- glad you are here,
    Jenny
     
  10. 3chimama

    3chimama Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 8, 2010
    Pacific Northwest
    Welcome! Everyone offered you great info...where I live they sell "crumbles" and no pellet. With baby chicks I always start with a medicated chick starter....
     

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