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Help! Need some advice on a rescued duck

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Miss Anne Duck, Dec 7, 2015.

  1. Miss Anne Duck

    Miss Anne Duck New Egg

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    Dec 2, 2015
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    This morning my mother-in-law brought us a Black Swedish drake. She has a rather large pond and we figured that someone just dumped him on the pond about a month ago. He had shown signs of being friendly, so we tried to catch him a couple of weeks ago. But he was enjoying his freedom to much and wasn't going to let that happen. Well this morning my mother-in-law was down by the pond and her small dogs found him and started to chase him. He pretty much ran straight in to her arms looking for safety. So she brought him to us. The poor guy is very under weight and was very hungry. I gave him some food and he started to eat it so fast he nearly choked on it. Right now he is only getting a small handful every couple hours or so. So my question is what is the best way to feed him and to get weight put back on him? We have some mallards and call ducks, but I have never had to rehabilitate a duck before. Also is there any way to age him? Oh and he is quarantined away from our other ducks.
    Thanks for any advice.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. User353335

    User353335 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would allow him access to food and water during all daylight hours. If he's hungry, hopefully, he'll eat and plump up. I would also give him access to grit. So long as he's got water and food, I'd just let him chow down. Make sure the feed is high quality duck / waterfowl feed. I wouldn't recommend "layer" feed (as he's a drake and doesn't need the extra calcium), but rather "shower grower" feed. I also wouldn't recommend force feeding him if he's got enough drive to eat himself.

    Regarding aging a duck, it's difficult... usually you can determine if they are an "adult" if he has his sex feathers and adult plumage, but I'm not aware of the changes beyond that. Maybe others will have better information. I've heard that some duck breeds can exhibit very slight changes in plumage as they age, but I'm not positive about that.

    I would also recommend using "Sav-A-Chick" as a supplement every other day or so until he is looking more healthy. I would also be careful mixing him with your current flock until you are certain he is free of disease.

    Thanks for taking him in! He most certainly would have died if you hadn't :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 8, 2015
    2 people like this.
  3. Free Spirit

    Free Spirit The Chiarian

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    @peepquack gave you some very good advice. I couldn't have said it better.
     
  4. User353335

    User353335 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks! :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 8, 2015
  5. Miss Anne Duck

    Miss Anne Duck New Egg

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    Dec 2, 2015
    Central California
    Thank you for the advice! He really isn't that bad off. His feathers are soft and well groomed, nothing broken or ratty. He's bright eyed and very alert. Just under weight. I think he just wasn't getting enough to eat, but was taking pretty good care of himself.
    Now that we have had him for several hours, he's show to be really people orientated and friendly. He is going to make a great addition to our family!
     
  6. User353335

    User353335 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm really happy for you! Best of luck, and if you have a chance, don't be shy about posting some photos! Keep us up to date.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 8, 2015
  7. Tevyes Dad

    Tevyes Dad Leader of the Quack Premium Member

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    Yes photos! Also do you have any other drakes? And how many ducks do you have? Adding a drake can present its own challenges if you only have one or two ducks or have more drakes and not enough ducks for them to share. That being said, I have two drakes and I love them dearly but 10 ducks are just barely enough in my case.
     
  8. Miss Anne Duck

    Miss Anne Duck New Egg

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    Central California
    The new guy just upped my total to 10. At the moment I'm very drake rich and duck poor [​IMG] I have two mallard pairs, 5 call ducks (3 males, 2 females), then the new guy a Swedish Black.
    [​IMG]

    Right now this is the only picture I have of the new one. He has been dubbed LD for Lucky Duck. He managed to survive a month in the "wild" on his own with bob cats.

    [​IMG]

    I don't have a very recent picture of the Little Heathens (hehe), they are around 2 1/2 months here. They are in their adolescent feathers. The bibbed by it self if the female, she ended up being the smallest the bibbed with the white on his back is the largest. He is almost the size of my mallards. The darker of the white ones, I'm pretty sure is a Snowy drake. The light one I not sure what she is color wise. If anyone knows, I would love to know.
    [​IMG]

    Here's a better picture of her. Now that she has her adult feathers, she hasn't really changed color. Maybe a little bit lighter.

    My Mallards are camera shy [​IMG]
     
  9. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners

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    I am late to this party - do you keep the females and males separated? I think you know to be aware of potential problems.
     
  10. Miss Anne Duck

    Miss Anne Duck New Egg

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    Dec 2, 2015
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    No, the males and females are together. I know in a couple of months I'll have to either pair them up or get every one separated.
     

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