Help Please.. Bo Hen Bullied You Can See Bare Neck- Update

raspeary

Songster
10 Years
Apr 13, 2009
265
0
131
Cortland New York
I need help. So yesterday afternoon I put my bo with my rhode island reds and cornish rocks in the big coop. They were doing fine all afternoon and evening. Well throughout the overnight period, some of my chickens bullied and pecked one of my buffs neck. You can see the blood and skin. I immediately cleaned out the wound with hydrogen peroxide and put a little vasaline on it for now and took out all three of my buffs and also I seperated the injured one in its own tote.

I don't know what chicken did this to her. When I put her back in the coop for a minute so I could prepare the two totes, the buff rooster pecked at her.

What do I need to do to get her back to health? What about the piece of skin and feathers that is still hanging on her? What do I do to put these chickens back into the coop with the rhode island reds? The cornish rocks are being butchered tonight so I won't have to worry about them?

What if the buff rooster did this to her and why since they have been togeter their whole life without problems?

She is doing pretty well. She does not flinch when I clean her wound with betadine or apply blu-kote. THe hen has been oblivious to her wound. I was surprised, I thought she would flinch when anything came in contact with it. Guess chickens are like super pain resistent! She will be ok i think.​
 
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tackyrama

Songster
11 Years
Aug 14, 2008
460
3
131
Central Minnesota USA
Sounds like normal behavior to establish the pecking order. The wounded one needs to be isolated in order to heal. It would help when you introduce new chickens if you can partition part of the coop with chicken wire. That way they can see each other and ease the process. I had major problems with introductions last year. This year with the partition I can't believe how smoothly the introductions work. Skin wounds heal very quickly from the outside in. You might need to use some antibiotic salve or bluekote if flies are bad.
 
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RendonRoo

Songster
10 Years
Feb 7, 2009
1,147
8
161
ft. worth
I've noticed that when a rooster is scolding a hen that they tend to grab neck feathers and pull them down. I've seen my rooster actually take the hen all the way to the ground this way. Usually not a problem and very normal. In your case the younger chick just wasn't strong enough and she was injured. I agree with seperation and slow introductions. Good Luck
 

raspeary

Songster
10 Years
Apr 13, 2009
265
0
131
Cortland New York
Quote:I am cleaning it with hydrogen peroxide and then putting neosporin on it. Today, I did that four times. Tomorrow, I won't be able to do it as much since I have to work. But will do it before work, as soon as I get home and at least once before I go to bed.
 

tonini3059

[IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.2.7[/IMG]Luv
11 Years
Nov 6, 2008
1,810
19
171
Southwestern PA
Try some blu kote that always helps me with picking. But that is normal behavior it is esp hard when you introduce little ones into the flock and they get pecked and pushed around for a few days then everyone settles down and all is well. It definitely is better if you can make a partition so they can see each other and get used to each other before tossing them in.
 

tonini3059

[IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.2.7[/IMG]Luv
11 Years
Nov 6, 2008
1,810
19
171
Southwestern PA
if you separate it you shouldn't need to keep reapplying the neosporin. Chickens are very hardy and recover niceley. I have had a few that actually split their skin and had a nice size gash that all i did was clean it thoroughly once and super glued it. Both recovered. I also had one that was completely scalped that the skull was showing...and still is..I cleaned it and sprayed the blu kote on it and left it be and it recovered also. They heal quickly.
 

dlhunicorn

Human Encyclopedia
13 Years
Jan 11, 2007
4,870
44
251
Don't keep using hydrogen peroxide... repeated use will damage not help > use sterile saline first to flush the wound and then apply neosporin. I cant possibly comment on anything "hanging" from the wound without seeing a pic of it.
KEEP YOUR BIRD SEPARATED FROM THE OTHERS TILL THE WOUND IS HEALED (dont count on the blukote to keep the others from pecking)
BE AWARE THAT MAGGOTS CAN EASILY OCCUR WITH OPEN WOUNDS IN AREA WHERE FLIES AND TEMPS ARE WARM ... so very many posts where ppl had a rather simple wound turn into a nightmare from flystrike (maggots)
 

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