Help With Broody

Feb 18, 2021
257
982
191
Texas
One of my sister's chickens, Buhk Buhk, has gone broody in a bad nesting box. Two of my chickens have faked going broody (only paid half attention to the eggs, which did not develop), but I think Buhk Buhk is serious. She has been in the nesting box for two days and I haven't seen her come out to drink or eat in the mornings when I let the chickens out. She is normally sweet, but now she's really angry, ha ha.
I would like to move her if possible. We have an old coop which is too small for our flock with good nesting boxes and there's a place where I can put food and water close to her. Is this a bad idea? If not, does anyone have any tips for moving her and preparing her nesting box area?
Thanks in advance.
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FeatherTay

Crowing
Jun 28, 2020
1,759
2,826
256
Kansas
You may be able to move her. As long as their are similar conditions. I had a broody, Hashbrown. She had 4 eggs make it, 1 I had to help because it almost got squished. 2 pipped and died. I tried to save her last one because it was 106° F in the coop so I thought maybe the heat was killing the chicks. I moved her into my house that was 73° F. She didn’t like it. Kept getting off her eggs. So I put her back in the coop where she got back on her eggs. I put a fan so that was cool enough and she was fine and she was in a different spot then she started off in, and she stayed. So moral of the story is that it’s just a observe game. If you do put food and water, make sure this is the only source of food and water. Hashbrown jumped out of the coop where the baby couldn’t get to and the baby ended up dying. Of what? I don’t know, but I think the other chickens attack/stepped on it, since momma wasn’t there. If there is food and water, momma can eat baby chicken starter, but babies can’t eat layer feed. So feed chick starter. Also make sure that the water has little rocks in it so the chicks don’t drown. Please update! 😊
 
Feb 18, 2021
257
982
191
Texas
So I moved her on day 18 to the little coop and she accepted the move! This time the little coop was next to the big coop and there was no hay in there. (I figured out that she doesn't like hay.) The fact that she's been on her eggs so long might have helped, too.
It's now day 24 and there seems to be at least one egg (out of six) pipping!
 
Feb 18, 2021
257
982
191
Texas
You may be able to move her. As long as their are similar conditions. I had a broody, Hashbrown. She had 4 eggs make it, 1 I had to help because it almost got squished. 2 pipped and died. I tried to save her last one because it was 106° F in the coop so I thought maybe the heat was killing the chicks. I moved her into my house that was 73° F. She didn’t like it. Kept getting off her eggs. So I put her back in the coop where she got back on her eggs. I put a fan so that was cool enough and she was fine and she was in a different spot then she started off in, and she stayed. So moral of the story is that it’s just a observe game. If you do put food and water, make sure this is the only source of food and water. Hashbrown jumped out of the coop where the baby couldn’t get to and the baby ended up dying. Of what? I don’t know, but I think the other chickens attack/stepped on it, since momma wasn’t there. If there is food and water, momma can eat baby chicken starter, but babies can’t eat layer feed. So feed chick starter. Also make sure that the water has little rocks in it so the chicks don’t drown. Please update! 😊
Thank you! Most of the time she prefers to lay eggs and roost in the coop I want to move her to anyway, so it might just work. The chicks can't fall to the ground in there when they hatch, either.
I will take pictures tomorrow if I am successful moving her and again when they hatch. They should hatch around the 5th of October!
 
Feb 18, 2021
257
982
191
Texas
She didn't accept the move. :I
I moved her last night and I could tell she was very confused. The first time I checked she wasn't on her eggs, so I put her on there and checked again later and she was on the eggs. In the morning she badly wanted out so I let her out a little bit, then right before leaving for church I locked her in the coop (with water of course). When we came home from church (and shopping) I fed her and then checked multiple times what she was doing. She seemed to jump up when she heard me coming so I'm not sure If she was sitting on the eggs. The hay and eggs were moved and they felt warmer than the outside temperature, so hopefully?

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I opened the little coop so she could go in and out how she pleased and she ran to the big coop and sat on the eggs the other chickens had laid today.
I looked it up and Google said that chicken embryos can survive up to 18 hours in temperatures lower than 90 degrees. It has hardly been under 90 today so I took all new eggs except one and gave her the old ones. She now has 7 eggs.
That chicken is more stubborn than my guinea Peabrain. 😂
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Will continue updating. :)
 

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NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
8,712
19,130
726
USA
Hey, just a question. I was able to wing sex both the dad and the mom, will the baby also be wing sexable? (Sorry if this is a dumb question, lol.)

Short answer: probably not.

Long answer:

Wing sexing usually means to tell fast feathering chicks from slow feathering chicks.
In many breeds, all chicks are fast feathering.
In some breeds, all chicks are slow feathering.
In some breeds, chicks are a random mix of fast and slow feathering that has nothing to do with gender.

If you cross a fast feathering male with a slow feathering female, you will get sons that feather slowly (like their mother) and daughters that feather quickly (like their father.) Hatcheries sometimes do it on purpose with certain strains of chickens, so they can sex the chicks by their at hatch instead of doing vent sexing.

But if you take chickens that were feather sexable as chicks (slow male, fast female) and breed them, you get a random mix of males & females of each feathering type.

It's because the feathering genes are on the Z sex chromosome.
A male has ZZ, one Z from his father and one from his mother. He passes a Z chromosome to each of his chicks.

A female has ZW. So a hen gets her W chromosome from her mother, with no affect on her feathering speed. She gets her Z chromosome from her father, and passes it to her sons.

All of the sexlink hybrids work the same basic way. The father must have the recessive gene (fast feathering, gold feather color, not-barred feathers) and the mother must have the dominant gene (slow feathering, silver feather color, barred feathers.) Because the mother's trait only goes to her sons and not her daughters, the sons will show that dominant trait. The daughters show the recessive trait from their father, and the sons carry that too but do not show it. This means those chicks do not have the right genetic makeup to produce sexlink chicks of their own.
 
Feb 18, 2021
257
982
191
Texas
So I moved her to the little coop and she really didn't like it in there, but while she was in there I fixed the nesting boxes in the big coop. I still need to add one finishing touch, but it's good enough for Buhk Buhk.

Before:
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After:
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Even my chicken Boo, who never lays eggs in the coop (😑) is sitting in one!
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(Sorry for the blurry pictures. I thought I took better ones, lol.)
I put Buhk Buhk in the corner nesting box that is in a low traffic area and today the chickens had done nothing to her eggs! 😁 Here's Buhk Buhk:
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