Help!

Nov 29, 2019
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60
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Arion Iowa 51520
Ok so I had bought eggs from Amazon and eBay and I've candled them and I don't see anything! They are going on 8 days old what do I need to look for? Or is it too early to tell?! I'm about to give up on trying to incubate chickens I'm having such terrible luck. ☹ Unless I can get eggs that are know to going to make it. I was so looking forward to hatching and raising chickens. But Everytime I try to hatch them they die in the hatching process or just don't hatch at all. What am I doing wrong? ☹
 
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Pyxis

Hatchi Wan Kenobi
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Mar 27, 2012
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At eight days you should be able to see life. Can you tell us a bit about your incubating technique? What temperature are you keeping the incubator at, and what humidity? Is your incubator still air or forced air?

Here is a link to my article that shows eggs on each day of development, so you can know what you're looking for.

Shipped eggs are always a gamble. It's much easier to hatch local eggs, especially when you're first starting out and getting the hang of things.
 
Nov 29, 2019
41
60
70
Arion Iowa 51520
At eight days you should be able to see life. Can you tell us a bit about your incubating technique? What temperature are you keeping the incubator at, and what humidity? Is your incubator still air or forced air?

Here is a link to my article that shows eggs on each day of development, so you can know what you're looking for.

Shipped eggs are always a gamble. It's much easier to hatch local eggs, especially when you're first starting out and getting the hang of things.
I have the mini tricottage incubator and I keep it at 38 Celsius it only does Celsius.
 

Gray Farms

Conserve Heritage Breed Livestock
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Apr 11, 2016
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38c is a little high "100.4f" but not to high as to interfere with development. Shipped eggs are always a gamble. At the very best you shouldn't expect over a 25%-30% hatch. Did you rest the eggs a day before you set them? Also shipping eggs in winter is even more of a gamble. If they get to cold the potential embryos will die. Also fertility can take a major drop in winter as rooster tend to breed less depending on the weather.

Also what humidity are you running in the incubator?
 

Rose Quartz

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Mar 18, 2018
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https://www.amazon.ca/hudiemm0B-Temperature-Humidity-Thermometer-Hygrometer/dp/B07RXWQCKM/ref=sr_1_13?keywords=tiny+thermometer+hygrometer&qid=1575995590&sr=8-13

these are really small, just a little bigger than the battery inside. I've used them before, so long as you test them first against a thermometer you know works, like a medical one, and calibrate the hyrometer - using the damp salt in a baggy test and then marking the difference. These work really well. And they're small enough they shouldn't mess with your turner.
 

Henry&Friends

Songster
May 6, 2018
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Hello! I’ve never incubated eggs, but I learned how to on BYC. Sorry you’re not having luck incubating your eggs. Shipped eggs tend to have a much lower success rate, and shipping eggs during winter risks them getting too chilled, jostled, etc. etc. During the winter, hens molt and reduce laying, and roosters molt and reduce breeding. So eggs shipped during winter will have a lower hatching rate. If these eggs aren’t viable, I would hold off trying to incubate eggs until early to mid spring.

where are you located? I’m sure a fellow BYC member would give you some eggs if you’re near them... if you wanna hike on over to WV, I’ll give you some :frow
 
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