HONEY for chooks eyes to prevent infection after removing a stray HUSK

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by GodofPecking, Dec 29, 2015.

  1. GodofPecking

    GodofPecking Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 16, 2015
    This is about my few weeks old chook, who I found had a wheat husk ? lodged in her eye the other day. I would look at her and think 'that is something in her eye, a hisk or something' t the bottom of her eye. Whenever I picked her up (two times ?) (and I am presuming she is a she, but it's very presumptive of me) she'd use her inside eyelid (which humans do not have, think sharks or something) and her second eyelid would push it back inside. So first twice I put her down for a while.

    Neither the chook or I could get the wheat husk out. So I wrapped her up, brought her and her companion inside and went fishing with my glasses and strong light. I found that it was bigger than I thought. Looked like a grain and the husk together. When I finally got a hold of it it appeared to be hooked in a bit, into her flesh in that soft part of the eye. Not good I thought. It came out, and she kept her eye closed. I thought of the possibility of infection, so I got out the freshest honey that I could find short of a hive and dipped a finger in. I aimed for her eye, pretty much got the upper lid, with a dribble down to the lower lid. She flinched and was noisy for 2 or three seconds and was then calm again, blinking it a bit and then leaving it closed again. I thought of waiting a while and then pouring drinking water over it, like you do for human ulcers and wounds, but figured she'd be more upset with me than if I just left it alone.

    Back in the cage the next day and day after that, her eye is fine. Possibly the lower lip around the eye is a tiny bit droopy on the first day, but oh, lots of the chooks have droopyish eyelips (what do you call it, is it the bottom eyelid? but it is not a lid).

    Today she is 100%, eyelid normal, but her behavior is a little bit more about her and her smaller companion staying indoors in their big packing crate box, rather than mixing it up with the adult flock as she looked forward to last week. I figure she'll be back to normal later in the week, rather than out just some of the time.

    Honey is good to dab onto human wounds and ulcers too, there is plenty in the media about it.
     

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