Horrible Neck Injury...Caused by (maybe) 23 week old Rooster

analyticalblonde

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My Lavender Orphinton, Sue - the sweetest girl I have that follows me around like a puppy - was severely injured today...about 2 hours ago. I have 13 chickens: 12 are hens; 1 Rooster. He is about 23 weeks old and in the past month, he's started showing his rooster behaviors. I am not absolutely certain he did this to Sue but I highly believe he did it. He has been getting more aggressive as the days have passed.

I have removed Sue as she was/is traumatized, bleeding. She was hiding in the far back corner of the coop. The gash on the back of her neck is about 3/4-1 inch long and the gash has gone down to her flesh.

Absolutely no preditor infiltration. Locked down solid and no breach of the coop and run.
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I want to know if this will heal on its own because I am so upset that I don't think I could do stitches...my hands are shaking and I wouldn't know what I was doing.

I have poultry first aid sprays, Neosporin, gauze pads and wraps to dress her wounds but I know they would need changing very frequently until the wound stops bleeding and begins to heal.

Would dressing the wound be sufficient? I am too unsure of myself to try and attempt stitches. Please help!!!
 

Eggcessive

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Poor girl. Separate her in a dog crate or pen with food and water. What do you have for cleaning a wound? Chlorhexidene 2% is very good, but you could also use Betadine, saline, or mild soap and water. Vetericyn or a similar hydrogel wound spray from the feed store would also be fine. Then after cleaning the wounds twice daily, apply plain Neosporin or Triple Antibiotic Ointment (or similar ointment) until the wounds heal. Leave them open, but place her on clean towels or puppy pads so bedding doesn’t contaminate them.

How is she doing? Is she alert, standing, eating or drinking?
This is a common injury of aggression. Most heal if the wounds do not get infected. It does take a lot of time healing. I would carefully watch the cockerel or separate him for awhile until you can spend time with him.
 

Eggcessive

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Last edited:

analyticalblonde

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Apr 30, 2018
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Tooele, UT
Poor girl. Separate her in a dog crate or pen with food and water. What do you have for cleaning a wound? Chlorhexidene 2% is very good, but you could also use Betadine, saline, or mild soap and water. Vetericyn or a similar hydrogel wound spray from the feed store would also be fine. Then after cleaning the wounds twice daily, apply plain Neosporin or Triple Antibiotic Ointment (or similar ointment) until the wounds heal. Leave them open, but place her on clean towels or puppy pads so bedding doesn’t contaminate them.

How is she doing? Is she alert, standing, eating or drinking?
This is a common injury of aggression. Most heal if the wounds do not get infected. It does take a lot of time healing. I would carefully watch the cockerel or separate him for awhile until you can spend time with him.
Hi @Eggcessive ...

Thank you so much for responding...When I saw Sue hiding and then realized she was seriously injured, I immediately removed her from the flock and put her downstairs in our basement where I have ready a very large dog crate, set up with roosting bar, pine shavings, and feed with waterer. I've stopped breaking the crate down because of instances in the past where I've had to bring in a girl from time to time to give first aid.

This is the first REAL serious injury I've had to deal with!

I have sprayed liberally Vetericyn Plus on the wound then followed up about an hour ago with MicrocynAH poultry care by MannaPro. I have not yet put the Neosporin (Original Ointment - not triple) on her yet but plan on doing it just before she goes down for the night.

Are the pine shavings OK...? I do not have puppy mats readily available and do clean up each day removing droppings.

She is standing, has eaten, and appears to be drinking - I made a fresh batch of water with both Probiotics and Electrolytes (Sav-A-Chick) - she is a little more alert than when I first brought her in about4 hours ago. Making some small talk. I am going to see if she will eat some boiled egg soon.

I have gone out to check on all my other girls to see if my rooster has done anything to them and last time I checked, they all are fine. However, I have decided to rehome my rooster because this event was so brutal - I don't want ANY of my girls to go through this again. If this is how he behaves at only being 23 weeks old, I don't want to risk my flock to any more attacks.
 

Eggcessive

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Hens can attack and peck necks as well, but the suspicion would be more for the cockerel. Some are overzealous at girst, and may calm down if they are separated for awhile. But I have removed one permanently who did that to my half blind polish hen once.

The pine shavings can get into the wound, so you can place an old towel or rags over the bedding.
 

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