HOW TO DEAL WITH A MEAN ROOSTER

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by MILOCHICKEN, Dec 6, 2016.

  1. MILOCHICKEN

    MILOCHICKEN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How do I deal with a rooster that is very Very VERY protective?
     
  2. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    Life is too short for mean roosters. Freezer camp!
     
  3. MILOCHICKEN

    MILOCHICKEN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OK[​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    Try searching for "managing roosters" - it's part genetics and how you behave - not dissimilar from owning a dog IMO. Rehabilitation is possible, but learning how to manage them may put you in good stead for the future. It's a lesson I learned the hard way.
     
  5. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Overrun With Chickens

    @CTKen is right....

    People think handling chicks a bunch and having a lap cockerel is great. Not realizing when he hits puberty he only cares about one thing and that isn't hanging out on your lap. This friendliness is misconstrued on the part of the cockerel. He doesn't fear you. And for chickens fear equals respect. If they respect you they will respect your personal space and step out of your way when you walk through their path. I did learn this, almost the hard way. But someone told me what was gonna happen so I changed my behavior. That friendly young cockerel tried to grab a pullet out of my lap once to mate her.

    Now I chase the boys a little to let them know I am the boss. I even knock them off when they are trying to mate in front of me.

    My previous answer was very short without taking your circumstances or goals into account. [​IMG] And also without asking if we are talking cockerel or rooster which is practically a whole different beast.

    If you don't have a specific need or goal in mind, I still say let him go...
     
  6. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    I agree. If breeding is not the goal then they serve no purpose. I.got rid of my roo yesterday as i will not be breeding for the next 6 months and he would have been only been adding to my feed bill.
     
  7. MILOCHICKEN

    MILOCHICKEN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    We do leave him for breeding... He is a Lavender Orpington and is beautiful. We got him and his sister from a farm for $5 each... We don,t want to get hid of him because we are going to sell his Lavender Orpington chicks for higher prices then $5.
     
  8. Triplecross

    Triplecross Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had raised a dominant jack russel puppy and he would growl at my son when son wanted to put him in his lap. Before "just getting rid of him", I tried a trick: I had son gently put puppy on the ground with his hand on his neck gently lay him down in a submissive stance. After a few times puppy stopped growling.

    When I had a aggressive rooster I did the same sort of thing but in chicken language. I would grab the attacking rooster and kindly hold him and walk around holding him and talking to him. Then I would put him back down very slow and gently. It shows them you are much bigger and more powerful but not a threatening subject.

    I would suggest trying this with roosters that aren't psycho crazy but ones that are just overly protective of hens.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2016
  9. Weehopper

    Weehopper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Put him in his own pen. It doesn't have to be huge. Make it portable so you can easily slide it around from day to day to put him on fresh ground. Put a hen in with him when you want to breed. If he's nice to her, and doesn't try to breed her to death, you can leave her in with him. If he's too frisky, only put her in three times a week or so. Or, you can use a chain link dog kennel (square), if you can afford it. those make nice brood pens also. You can add hardware cloth around the outside to make it predictor proof. Oh..and add a roof. [​IMG]
     
  10. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    Human aggressive cockbirds do not need to be in the gene pool, no matter how 'pretty' they are! If he responds to 'attitude adjustments' after two or three tries, great. If he continues to challenge people, he belongs in the crockpot. I love having cocks and cockerels, but screen out the jerks as they appear. Mary
     

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