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Howdy From Texas . . .

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by TexasWineGuy, Jun 15, 2019.

  1. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician

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    Welcome to BYC and your new chicken adventure. I would recommend 3 rather than 2 - if/when one dies that would leave two to remain as company for one another.
     
  2. fldiver97

    fldiver97 Enabler

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    My Coop
    Welcome :welcome Nice to have you here! The coop section has a lot of great ideas/examples of coops, tractors, runs.... all sizes and styles.
     
  3. Celticdragonfly

    Celticdragonfly Crowing

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    Welcome to BYC! Do say hi on the Texas thread in the Where Am I? section of the forums. And definitely read through the Learning Center articles - I found so much helpful stuff there. Yeah, the commercial prefab coops are too small for what they say they can hold.
     
  4. Celticdragonfly

    Celticdragonfly Crowing

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    Sounds like damn fine advice to me.
     
    rjohns39 and ronott1 like this.
  5. TexasWineGuy

    TexasWineGuy Songster

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    Sour,

    If my daughter does well with the 2, we will add another fairly soon, when I have completed a larger "run" that will attach to the existing coop.

    TWG
     
  6. TexasWineGuy

    TexasWineGuy Songster

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    Update: Got the Coop ready after a few small modifications.

    We reinforced the main frame, modified the mount for the coop access ramp, and for now, added some carry handles so that we can move the entire coop to give them some fresh grass in the "run".

    We also replaced every door and access window latching mechanism, because what was installed would not keep a racoon out for very long at all. We installed new latches, with spring loaded ring locks. If a racoon gets in there - they deserve to eat the chickens.

    I have attached (hopefully) some pics below. One of the questions I have is about ventilation: I think the actual coop might need some more ventilation based on some comments I've seen in some other threads here at BYC. Note the ventilation window on the "back" of the coop. Thoughts?

    If I need more ventilation, what is a good way to have a new window, but be able to easily cover it in the cold winter?

    We get the 2 hens tomorrow morning! We will be getting one Ameraucana, and one Black Laced Wyandotte from my brother. They are young, and should start laying eggs within the next month (I think).

    Once we get comfortable with the 2 hens (translation: know what the heck we are doing...), I will begin to work on a portable Run that I can butt up against this existing structure.

    Another question: At some point we would like to be able to let them out of the Coop to walk around our property (1 acre). However, due to local predators we would have to do so when we are present. My question is: How do we train them to go back into the coop/run structure on command? Thoughts?

    Thanks for any suggestions.

    TWG
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Celticdragonfly

    Celticdragonfly Crowing

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    Saginaw, TX
    On letting them out - have them well used to the coop first, maybe a week. Then when you are first ready to let them out, do it in the early evening, maybe half an hour before sunset. They will want to go back to the familiar coop to roost for the night. It worked well for me.
     
  8. TexasWineGuy

    TexasWineGuy Songster

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    Celtic,

    Thanks for the reply. What about training them to get back into the coop/run during the daytime? I need to be able to let them out during the day, but also get them in when we can't be out there with them.

    TWG
     
  9. rjohns39

    rjohns39 Wrangler

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    Ventilation is probably just as or more important in winter. Generally speaking you want about one square foot per bird and you want it not to produce drafts. Most folks will put half of it down low and the remainder up high.

    During the winter moisture will accumulate in the coop and contribute to frost bite, if there isn't enough ventilation.
     
  10. TexasWineGuy

    TexasWineGuy Songster

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    Magnolia, TX

    Help me understand the conundrum of needing ventilation, but also needing to keep them warm. How do I do both?

    Thanks,
    TWG
     

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