Hunting quail.

Discussion in 'Quail' started by jyphotog, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. jyphotog

    jyphotog Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 5, 2011
    A couple of questions. I had a friend offer to pay fair market value for me to raise around 500 quail for him to release on his property for hunting.

    1. What type of quail?
    2. What age should I sell them?
    3. A good way to figure out the value?

    Could anyone help me out with these questions?
     
  2. VelvettFog

    VelvettFog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 7, 2011
    Yakima, WA
    Quote:First thing you need to do is get with your state Fish and Wildlife -- you may need permits before you can release them.
     
  3. jyphotog

    jyphotog Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 5, 2011
    What if I raise in Ga, and release in Tn.? Also, it would be on his property. Does that not matter?
     
  4. Whitehouse Quail

    Whitehouse Quail Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2009
    Michigan
    Quote:Most likely he is looking for bobwhites.

    1. Bobwhites, preferably Northern if he's looking for a hunting experience, jumbo for meat.
    2. Once they are fully mature (Something like 20 weeks? I honestly can't remember right now) and have been flight conditioned for a minimum of six weeks. This is a major cost in bird production for huntting reserves etc etc.
    3. Just keep track of your reciepts for all supplies and all costs involved, divide by 500, and see your break even price. Then add, say, fifty cents to a dollar apiece? So, in theory, if you spent $1500, you break even price would be $3 a bird. Raise it up to $4 or $5 a bird, and you could be making $500 to $1000 on this batch. Five dollars is about what I hear for raising bobs for hunting, especially with flight pens. Once you get the overhead cost dissolved, it can be quite a profitable venture.

    I urge you to look into gamebird licensing for ANY form of release, just in case. This crosses the boundary between raising quail and raising quail commercially. [​IMG]

    Good luck in your venture!
     
  5. jyphotog

    jyphotog Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 5, 2011
    ahh, Do they have to be flight conditioned, or is this something someone would pay extra for?
     
  6. MobyQuail

    MobyQuail c. giganticus

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    Quailtropolis
  7. Whitehouse Quail

    Whitehouse Quail Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2009
    Michigan
    Quote:Well, I guess they aren't required to be. People do sell flight conditoined birds for more, that is true. Flight conditioning basically just improves the hunter's experience, because otherwise the birds can't fly as far/high/fast, which takes the hunter out of the 'moment.' I don't get shooting birds that were raised specifically to be shot, but hey, to each their own!
     
  8. jyphotog

    jyphotog Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 5, 2011
    Quote:Well, I guess they aren't required to be. People do sell flight conditoined birds for more, that is true. Flight conditioning basically just improves the hunter's experience, because otherwise the birds can't fly as far/high/fast, which takes the hunter out of the 'moment.' I don't get shooting birds that were raised specifically to be shot, but hey, to each their own!

    Well, I will put him on to someone else then. I live in a darn HOA, and they would freak! I am assuming!
     
  9. MobyQuail

    MobyQuail c. giganticus

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    Quailtropolis
    http://www.georgiawildlife.com/sites/default/files/uploads/wildlife/hunting/PrivateLands/QuailPages/Pen-Raised%20Quail%20in%20Georgia.pdf

    Pen-Raised
    Quail in Georgia
    Frequently Asked Questions
    Will releasing pen-raised quail into the wild help restore wild quail?
    - Releasing pen-raised quail into the wild is a common question relative to restoring wild
    bobwhite populations. In fact, during the mid 1900’s, a few state game and fish agencies began
    propagating quail as a means to restore and sustain bobwhite populations but were unsuccessful.
    We know a small percentage of pen-raised quail that are released into the wild may pair up with
    one another and even wild birds and mate, however there is no scientific evidence that pen-raised
    birds have the ability to survive and reproduce in the wild at levels capable of restoring selfsustaining
    wild bobwhite populations. Additionally, releasing pen-raised birds into the wild can
    potentially introduce disease and parasites into wild bird populations, create competition with
    wild quail for food and/or mates, and concentrate and increase exposure to predators. However,
    most of these concerns have not been adequately addressed through research, but the potential
    exists. That being said, pen-raised birds are useful for training dogs, providing a quail hunting
    experience and meeting shooting objectives on shooting preserves and lands where wild quail
    restoration isn’t feasible or practical, which helps to maintain interest and support for
    conservation of wild quail populations. Restoring wild quail populations requires dedicated and
    focused implementation of habitat management practices to meet annual habitat needs of the
    bobwhite.
    Is it legal to trap wild quail or collect wild quail eggs and use these as a source for penraised
    quail?
    - It is illegal to trap wild quail or collect wild quail eggs as a source for pen-raised quail.
    What permits are needed to open a commercial shooting preserve?
    - A Commercial Shooting Preserve license (#040) is required to operate a shooting preserve
    where participants pay to shoot pen-raised game birds. Currently, a Blanket Shooting Preserve
    license (#046) allows participants to shoot without purchasing a hunting license. These licenses
    are available for further review and download on our website,
    http://www.georgiawildlife.com/commercial-licenses.
    Do I need a permit to raise and sell pen-raised quail?
    - Yes, a Commercial Quail Breeder license (#026) is required to propagate pen-raised quail for
    commercial purposes. This license is available for review and download on our website,
    http://www.georgiawildlife.com/commercial-licenses.
     

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