Incubators...making a homemade one..

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by chickenlover4yo, Nov 2, 2015.

  1. chickenlover4yo

    chickenlover4yo Out Of The Brooder

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    so I need help on how to make the most trustworthy incubator I can any style anything but it has to be made from homemade materials and nothing to fancy.
    i'v seen a few pics of gimmie birdies incubator on a forum (homemade) and its totally fabulous! I would love to make an incubator like that so if you ave any ideas on how to make a homemade incubator please tell me!!

    I need anything ASAP cause we have more than 30 eggs needing a safe and trustworthy incubator...



    instructions step by step would be VERY helpful[​IMG]


    Thanks in advanced!


    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Why does it have to be made from materials from the home? Is this a school project or something?

    If you want to have a fun project and still end with a super reliable incubator then purchasing the electrical parts as one unit and putting into the box you make is economical, reliable and still a good project for the whole family to get into.

    http://incubatorwarehouse.com/48-watt-incukit-dc.html

    This (link above) is an all in one unit that comes preset to 99.5F thermostat for it's built in heater and has a built in fan to boot. To purchase good heaters, thremostat control and what not your starting to invest a lot of money. This little unit is only $50 and has all those high quality parts and features built in. It's sized for typical desktop units meaning if you build a box large enough for an auto egg turner this would maintail the heat.

    What your building than is a box with lid. What ever you have or what ever your flair for design you build. If I ever needed another incubator I'd go this route. Likely build a wood box with lid that had two layers of plexiglass (top and bottom) glued to rabbited edge square in the lid making for a large picture window that is insulated. For air vents in top you'd use a rubber or plastic tube cut to fit and be glued on both ends to glass. That way the insulated air between plexi panels can't escape.

    I like finished wood so would stain and finish the exterior of the box. Also place on tiny legs, just enough so air flow under the box can come up through the few small holes drilled in bottom of box for ventilation.

    A person could just as easily place this unit in a small tote, drill a fey holes and cut out a window on top with nothing more than clear plastic. It's all on how fancy you want to get with the project.
     
  3. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Keep in mind people have hatched eggs by simply using a styrofoam cooler and light socket with a dimmer switch spliced inline of the wire. Adjust the dimmer to obtain the correct heat from a 40W bulb. This would be a semi reliable still air incubator. Still airs in general work perfectly well if the person knows to the temp is adjusted to 101.5F measured at top level of eggs.
     
  4. chickenlover4yo

    chickenlover4yo Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks EggHead! and nah its not a school project its simply for hatching more cute baby chickens at home ! [​IMG]

    and the only reason I said materials from home was because I thought it would make things easier for people.. [​IMG]




    Thanks again and now im only hoping for some more posts ;)
     
  5. mirandaleecon

    mirandaleecon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just made an incubator out of an old minifridge. I paid $25 for it, but if I was patient, I probably could have gotten one for free. Just posted an add on craigslist, got quite a few responses and a couple were willing to give me one free but they were too far away. I cut a hole in the door and glued a piece of glass (no idea where this came from) so I had a window.

    I used a couple computer fans (<$5, could be free if you know someone who builds computers or you have some you can break down), mounted in one of the plastic shelves, facing opposite directions to create good airflow. I wired these into old phone chargers.

    For heat, I salvaged a light socket and had to buy one ($3), wired them into old computer power cables.

    To control the heat, I bought an inkbird temperature controller ($18) and wired it to an outlet ($2) and mounted these two in a project box ($8). I plugged the lights into this and set it to the temperature I want it to cut the lights off.

    So, this amounts to about $60. A lot of these things can be salvaged, if you keep your eyes open and can be patient. I'm not sure how many eggs it will hold because I haven't quite finished the shelves. I just make one really rinky dink one to test it out with. I imagine it would hold at least 60 though...

    I can post pictures tonight...
     
  6. gimmie birdies

    gimmie birdies Overrun With Chickens

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    Even my incubators still cost me about $25 bucks to make, of course once I have all the parts I am set. and it took me years of playing to make one I really trust. If you are new to the game, I would jut buy one.
     

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