integrating a roo

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Ginmary, Nov 19, 2018.

  1. Ginmary

    Ginmary Songster

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    I have 3 hens: 1 Buff Orp, 1 Ameracauna, and one Silkie. They are all about 7 months old, hatched mid-April. We got another Silkie that was supposed to be a pullet but is definitely a roo. He was hatched 7/19 so is about 4 months old.

    I would like him to get along with the girls. Is it easier, harder, or the same to add a roo to hens as opposed to adding another female? He's pretty timid for a roo and runs frantically from our Seramas. (at least half his size.) Yet, he will dominate the cats!
     
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  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician

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    More mature hens will beat up on a young cockerel. I would not try to integrate him until he is mature and crowing.
     
  3. alexa009

    alexa009 Crossing the Road

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    @sourland is right. Since he is a bantam, he is still more likely to be dominated over the hens but the chances are not as high and they won't take high advantage of him. My Delaware hen (5 lbs) is boss over my Black Copper Maran rooster who is 8 lbs. Now tell me that isn't suprising! :eek:
     
  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging

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    He should be out there, separated by wire fencing, for at least a week, and then, if you can free range, let him out alone at first, to learn the territory. After a few days, try them outside together, and have extra feeders and waterers, and watch.
    I think that cockerels integrate easier than pullets, and these slightly older girls will keep him humble, at least for a while. Don't let anyone get injured!
    Mary
     
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  5. adstowe

    adstowe Songster

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    He should be out there, separated by wire fencing, for at least a week, and then, if you can free range, let him out alone at first, to learn the territory. After a few days, try them outside together, and have extra feeders and waterers, and watch.
    I think that cockerels integrate easier than pullets, and these slightly older girls will keep him humble, at least for a while. Don't let anyone get injured!

    This. They are still pretty young too. Take it slow and it should be fine. Keep an eye on them the first few times you let them out together, but don't be overbearing. They are going to pick on him. Make sure they have plenty of room and hiding places for him. As long as they aren't injuring him, let it be. They are teaching him manners. I'd take a roo raised with older girls over one raised with younger girls anytime. Although, since cockerels mature faster than pullets the minimal age difference is negligible.
     

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