Introducing Ducks to a small male and female flock

Bloo

Chirping
8 Years
Jan 15, 2014
12
11
94
I have a pair of mallards, one male, one female. they have been together since birth and are now around 8 years old and are realy sweet with each other. I recently rescued two cherry valley females who are 2 years old and my male isn't acting the same with them. He spends all day whilst being free range passing outside the new ducks avery (I currently have them in separate averys and separate living quarters). After two weeks of having them separate I aloud everyone to be free range at the same time and my male ran straight to the new girls and grabbed one of the new females by her neck and was trying to mate her without her consent. The new females were shouting and distressed so I separated them again and put them back in their separate averys. The new girls are alot bigger than my original ducks but are extremely timid.
Dose anyone have any advice on how to proceed? Should I just let it play out and maybe his over-interest will subdue or should I rehome the cherry valleys? Or maybe more time separated will help?
 
He has to make them his. Can they see each other when separated? It takes a while for new females to be accepted and of course the only way the drake knows how to do this is to mate with them. My Muscovy females don't give consent to be mated my Muscovy drake he just grabs on and the girls end up submitting because he is so much bigger than them. Now my Runners and Buffs literally throw themselves at the Runner drake.
So every breed is probably different. Hopefully it will work out for yours once they have been together for a while.
 
Each drake is also very different. I lucked out and have a drake that will court his females most of the time before he mates them. Other times he will just grab them, none of them are stressed out by him. Some of the girls send him mixed signals.

I had another drake that grew up with the flock. When he matured, he was very enthusiastic about mating and didn't give the girls a break. He was rather forceful. He was stressing out females and our other drake out. So we choose to rehome him. He was just too much for our flock. Some drakes just don't work out.

Your drake may also calm down when the breeding season ends. He may or may not calm down with time with these new females. Always hard to tell.
 
Thanks both of you for your replies. I let them all out together again today after reading your messages and the same happened again but my male is so much smaller than the females so he cant force the new females to submit. The females just run around shouting with my male chasing them and hanging off their necks. I cut it short after a few minutes to save getting any neighbour complaints from all the quacking but Im assuming after a few times of allowing this to happen, my male will eventually realise he isn't going to get any without their consent and hopefully will give up and realise he will have to court them instead of just jumping their bones.
Thanks again for replying with advice :)
 
Thanks both of you for your replies. I let them all out together again today after reading your messages and the same happened again but my male is so much smaller than the females so he cant force the new females to submit. The females just run around shouting with my male chasing them and hanging off their necks. I cut it short after a few minutes to save getting any neighbour complaints from all the quacking but Im assuming after a few times of allowing this to happen, my male will eventually realise he isn't going to get any without their consent and hopefully will give up and realise he will have to court them instead of just jumping their bones.
Thanks again for replying with advice :)
I would keep them separate for another couple of months. Drake hormones start to wane in AUgust and by september, you drake my not be so agressive with the new girls.

Good luck
 
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