Kalyxxiii

In the Brooder
May 2, 2020
9
26
28
New Brunswick, Canada
I currently have 6, one week old chicks. I will also be getting 3 hens tomorrow. My coop is currently empty as my chicks are in a brooder indoors at the moment. What would be the best way to go about introducing the hens to the new coop/run and also the chicks to the adults once they’re ready to go in the coop outdoors? I’m completely new to this whole chicken keeping thing! I definitely need help here 😆 haha
 

Zan

Chirping
Jul 7, 2017
82
77
86
Western Oregon, USA
I would put the hens in the coop and leave them closed in for a couple of days so they learn where "home" is. Chickens go back "home" at night.

Once the chicks are old enough, do the same thing. The hens will pick on them a bit, but as long as there is enough space, there usually isn't any damage.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Nov 27, 2012
84,311
97,704
1,677
SW Michigan
My Coop
I'd be nervous about adding older birds to your brand new flock.
Consider biological/medical quarantine:
BYC Medical Quarantine Article

How big is your coop and run, in feet by feet?
Dimensions and pics would help here.

As far as integrating chicks, this is the best way I've found:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/integrating-new-birds-at-4-weeks-old.72603/
Still observing the .......
Integration Basics:
It's all about territory and resources(space/food/water).
Existing birds will almost always attack new ones to defend their resources.
Understanding chicken behaviors is essential to integrating new birds into your flock.

Confine new birds within sight but physically segregated from older/existing birds for several weeks, so they can see and get used to each other but not physically interact.

In adjacent runs, spread scratch grains along the dividing mesh, best if mesh is just big enough for birds to stick their head thru, so they get used to eating together.

The more space, the better.
Birds will peck to establish dominance, the pecked bird needs space to get away. As long as there's no copious blood drawn and/or new bird is not trapped/pinned down and beaten unmercilessly, let them work it out. Every time you interfere or remove new birds, they'll have to start the pecking order thing all over again.

Multiple feed/water stations. Dominance issues are most often carried out over sustenance, more stations lessens the frequency of that issue.

Places for the new birds to hide 'out of line of sight'(but not a dead end trap) and/or up and away from any bully birds. Roosts, pallets or boards leaned up against walls or up on concrete blocks, old chairs tables, branches, logs, stumps out in the run can really help. Lots of diversion and places to 'hide' instead of bare wide open run.
Good ideas for hiding places:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/a-cluttered-run.1323792/

Oh and... Welcome to BYC! @Kalyxxiii
Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
1588512926134.png
 

Kalyxxiii

In the Brooder
May 2, 2020
9
26
28
New Brunswick, Canada
I'd be nervous about adding older birds to your brand new flock.
Consider biological/medical quarantine:
BYC Medical Quarantine Article

How big is your coop and run, in feet by feet?
Dimensions and pics would help here.

As far as integrating chicks, this is the best way I've found:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/integrating-new-birds-at-4-weeks-old.72603/
Still observing the .......
Integration Basics:
It's all about territory and resources(space/food/water).
Existing birds will almost always attack new ones to defend their resources.
Understanding chicken behaviors is essential to integrating new birds into your flock.

Confine new birds within sight but physically segregated from older/existing birds for several weeks, so they can see and get used to each other but not physically interact.

In adjacent runs, spread scratch grains along the dividing mesh, best if mesh is just big enough for birds to stick their head thru, so they get used to eating together.

The more space, the better. Birds will peck to establish dominance, the pecked bird needs space to get away. As long as there's no copious blood drawn and/or new bird is not trapped/pinned down and beaten unmercilessly, let them work it out. Every time you interfere or remove new birds, they'll have to start the pecking order thing all over again.

Multiple feed/water stations. Dominance issues are most often carried out over sustenance, more stations lessens the frequency of that issue.

Places for the new birds to hide 'out of line of sight'(but not a dead end trap) and/or up and away from any bully birds. Roosts, pallets or boards leaned up against walls or up on concrete blocks, old chairs tables, branches, logs, stumps out in the run can really help. LotsO
I'd be nervous about adding older birds to your brand new flock.
Consider biological/medical quarantine:
BYC Medical Quarantine Article

How big is your coop and run, in feet by feet?
Dimensions and pics would help here.

As far as integrating chicks, this is the best way I've found:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/integrating-new-birds-at-4-weeks-old.72603/
Still observing the .......
Integration Basics:
It's all about territory and resources(space/food/water).
Existing birds will almost always attack new ones to defend their resources.
Understanding chicken behaviors is essential to integrating new birds into your flock.

Confine new birds within sight but physically segregated from older/existing birds for several weeks, so they can see and get used to each other but not physically interact.

In adjacent runs, spread scratch grains along the dividing mesh, best if mesh is just big enough for birds to stick their head thru, so they get used to eating together.

The more space, the better. Birds will peck to establish dominance, the pecked bird needs space to get away. As long as there's no copious blood drawn and/or new bird is not trapped/pinned down and beaten unmercilessly, let them work it out. Every time you interfere or remove new birds, they'll have to start the pecking order thing all over again.

Multiple feed/water stations. Dominance issues are most often carried out over sustenance, more stations lessens the frequency of that issue.

Places for the new birds to hide 'out of line of sight'(but not a dead end trap) and/or up and away from any bully birds. Roosts, pallets or boards leaned up against walls or up on concrete blocks, old chairs tables, branches, logs, stumps out in the run can really help. Lots of diversion and places to 'hide' instead of bare wide open run.
Good ideas for hiding places:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/a-cluttered-run.1323792/

Oh and... Welcome to BYC! @Kalyxxiii
Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
View attachment 2120343
thanks for the info! I definitely will be quarantining the new hens. Especially since I’m new to taking care of chickens, I don’t want to take any risks as I might not catch signs a more experienced chicken keeper might notice more quickly. Right now the coop is empty and where I am it’s still pretty cold out especially at nights so the chicks won’t be out for about another month or so anyway, so that’s pretty easy to do.

The run is 16 feet by 10 feet and 8 feet high. We have 3 acres the birds can roam as well it’s just not fenced and there are a lot of predators so I am planing on fencing the part of my yard that we mow and maintain so I can keep an eye on them if they’re not in the run.

My coop is about 40 square feet. In my coop I have 3 roosts of different heights/sizes and I also have 3 nesting boxes (not yet installed since I didn’t want the chicks to get used to mucking them up before they are laying).

the chicks currently have lots of little huts and whatnot to hide away under that I can move outside with them when they go outside. There’s also a tree in the corner of the run that the bigger hens wouldn’t fit behind. Multiple water and food dishes is also a good option for us too.

I don’t have any photos right now but I can take some later!
 

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