Is anyone locking down for Avian flu?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Beth77, Dec 8, 2016.

  1. Beth77

    Beth77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh no, that's concerning. Hopefully it doesn't escalate that far, you're general hygiene sounds great so hopefully you'll be fine. Is it chicken wire that you use for your run? You could cover the sides with tarp to keep birds out.
     
  2. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    The avian flu (at least the worst kind in North America) is spread by wild water fowl.

    It will do you or your birds no good to isolate them because the flu in and of its self is not what is tested for but whether your birds have been exposed and by being exposed they have developed a resistance to avian flu.

    There will be NO vaccine allowed for this disease because a vaccine will result in a positive test for avian flu.

    I don't know what measures are used in Europe but in North America a single positive test can spell doom for your entire flock.

    Even a positive test in a nearby flock can condemn your entire flock.
     
  3. Petra Pancake

    Petra Pancake Chillin' With My Peeps

    Well, as was written earlier in this thread, in some countries like Britain (and other countries in Europe, like Italy, Germany, Austria) it is now compulsory to keep your chickens inside - there doesn't seem to be much of a choice in the matter. Other countries, like Israel, recommend it without enforcement. Water fowl have a great part in spreading Avian flu, but other kinds of birds do as well, such as migratory small birds (that's the problem here) and sparrows. From what I read, the latest Avian flu strains kill almost 100% of infected chickens - there wouldn't be be many left to develop a resistance. Should any of my chickens die in a suspicious way, I'd inform authorities immediately and hand the rest of the flock over if necessary. I love my chickens, but containing a disease that can become fatal to humans is more important.
     
  4. Petra Pancake

    Petra Pancake Chillin' With My Peeps

    Anyway, the deed is done. I've divided my run in half and covered one half with tarp. Because there are still a few holes and corners where it doesn't quite fit, I've ringed the whole thing on the top with straps of aluminium foil and thin plastic that flap in the wind and hopefully discourage wild birds from making themselves comfortable there. It's not very neat - as it is a kind of half circle, actually it looks a bit funny, like a big, lumpy circus tent with little flags made from rubbish... [​IMG] But I hope it works, anyway. I just discovered that our neighbor's huge pine trees, which are only about 30 meters away, are stuffed full with what must be hundreds of twittering wild birds [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016
  5. rebrascora

    rebrascora Overrun With Chickens

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    I kind of feel sorry for the wild birds. After being used to lots of feeders, people are taking them down to discourage them, right at a point when their immune systems need supporting to prevent them getting flu.
     
  6. Wooper

    Wooper Just Hatched

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    Our vet advised that the threat is mainly from migrating birds and the Farming Today programme seemed to recommend a lock down "if possible" and the Defra site says they dont want poples chooks to be kept in the dark all the time. Our girls have a large shed with windows and I am also letting them run quickly (encouraged by mealworms) the 4 metres across to the empty greenhouse which they love.
     
  7. jools2014

    jools2014 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My birds weren't too bad after being shut up-and it wasn't as dark as I thought in the henhouse during the day. I put some treats in and a chair for them, I read someone was going to put bottles and cardboard boxes in to relieve boredom a bit-I don't know if my birds would bother with those though. I suppose you could cut holes in and make a little play area for them lol. Oh i just realised-what about dust baths? What is everyone doing for that-seems a bad idea to take soil from outside, is there anything else I can use? Buy something to use for their bath maybe? What do people normally do for their hens when they are inside-don't chickens need dust baths everyday to clean themselves.


    Are we supposed to avoid wild birds whether we keep chickens or not? It seems the threat is going to be from anywhere and everywhere, and any one of us could carry it around whether we have chickens or not...but bird keepers are the only people supposed to be careful. We haven't had bird feeders for years but did have a bird bath which the wild birds love-I've taken it down for now.
     
  8. Beth77

    Beth77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Why don't you buy a small sack of sand/soil from B&Q or something and put it in a shallow plastic box, maybe a little tubtrug with a little opening cut in to it for easy access? That would mean you weren't using anything that's possibly contaminated. I think that's what I'll do. I'll try sticking a few bottles in too for entertainment, it's worth a try.

    I'm going to avoid wild birds as much as possible; it's a shame, it's not their fault but it's not worth the risk. As for non-poultry keepers, I think they're just generally being advised to not put feed out etc. But I'm not sure if DEFRA has mentioned it.
     
  9. Beth77

    Beth77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's good you have windows in your shed, it'll make all the difference for them. I'd love to let mine out for a quick run but I'm too wary that they'll come into contact with infected droppings.
     
  10. Beth77

    Beth77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Now t
    That's good - although not so much about the nearby wild birds. Fingers crossed they'll stay separate.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016

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