Is it ok for ducks to mate with brothers and sisters?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by sandcat, Oct 13, 2010.

  1. KansasKid

    KansasKid Songster

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    Feb 7, 2010
    South East Kansas
    I'm sorry, I wasn't personally attacking you i was just trying to ask you a legitimate question. I did a search on it but my internet/computer is having trouble loading pages for some reason.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2010
  2. Snakeman

    Snakeman In the Brooder

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    I've been breeding reptiles for over 25 years and dogs off and on for most of my life. I've got several duck and Muscovy breeding projects planned for the spring. In all cases I've found that as long as I did some careful outbreeding once every 3 generations, I could avoid any serious issues and still keep the traits I am trying to work with. Just my personal experience.
     
  3. Senna95

    Senna95 Songster

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    Line breeding of any animal is how we got so many breeds in such a (relatively) short time. How else did we get from wolf to dachsund or great dane in a matter of a few thousand years? But I think that many breeders take it too far just for the sake of looks, and that precious trophy: for example, many german shepards have bad hips due to too much inbreeding....... how does that make a better herding dog? It just LOOKS better, but in my opinion is no longer able to be a SHEEP HERDER.

    Same goes for birds. We've gone from malards to Indian runners and Jumbo pekins. We have ducks that lay close to 350 eggs per year to jumbo Pekins that can weigh up to 12 or 13 pounds. Hardly any can fly, but we generally concider that a good trait (though the ducks might beg to differ).

    Most of the differences we see beween the animals we raise and breed and their wild ancestors were caused by a mutation. The only way to ensure that that trait (the mutation) re-occurs and becomes its own strain is by line-breeding, otherwise the trait eventually gets lost. So those of you that are against line breeding should own only malards or (wild colored) muscovies, because while YOU may not be line-breeding, it is almost guaranteed that someone else in the past has.

    If you're just trying to breed the same animals as copies of their parents, and you're happy with the way your ducks are, then you SHOULD breed from different genetic lines with similar features. It does genrally make for a more vigerous animal. Or just breed different breeds together for even more vigerous birds. However, if you're trying to improve on a certain trait then you almost HAVE TO line breed.
     
  4. pardygwyn

    pardygwyn Songster

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    I don't think most GSD lines have been bred for sheep for many generations now. ;D Though you can still find the original sheep-herding landrace in Germany that sprung from the same roots as the GSD! They're called "Altdeutsche H├╝tehunde" or "Old German Shepherd," and you can get a quick background on them here: http://www.herdingontheweb.com/english.htm

    I do agree that many take linebreeding too far... a quote I saw last year that made me laugh was "new breeders outcross too often, longtime breeders probably don't outcross enough." It is possible to use linebreeding to preserve genetic diversity in a small population, as well... keeping genetic pockets distinct by linebreeding means you'll always be able to find an outcross when you need one.
     
  5. sandcat

    sandcat Songster

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    I got my ducks from a friend, would it be a good idea to do a trade with the drake for one of hers, any drake i get will be somehow related to the ducks i have as they are from the same duck family. or should i try to get a drake that isnt related at all?
     
  6. Rosecomb-Ryan

    Rosecomb-Ryan East Indie Crazed

    Apr 12, 2008
    Sacramento CA
    I line breed my cayugas.. I had a pen of related birds. Grandma, Her children, her Grandchildren, and her Great Grand children.. I put one of my drakes from that pen with some unrelated birds and terrable Cayugas and the ducklings I got from the related pen were perfect. I got some super nice ones. I bet there was some brother sister breeding in there but whatever I got nice birds.. Personally I dont think you will have a ploblem... Most people that breed birds Line breed and thats how they get best birds. Most of the time when you put a new unrelated bird in there the flaws get brought out.



    Ryan
     
  7. Rosecomb-Ryan

    Rosecomb-Ryan East Indie Crazed

    Apr 12, 2008
    Sacramento CA
    Quote:Well what are you breeding them for? Show? Or? If for show I would trade for another drake from related stock... for eggs ect. I would get a new drake from an unrelated stock or dont worry about it..


    Ryan
     
  8. sandcat

    sandcat Songster

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    They are just pets really, we will eat some of them(i think if im brave enough to actually do it), just asked the question because im a really new duck owner and want to do the right thing by my ducks.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. chickens<3Mallards

    chickens<3Mallards Hatching

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    i am wondering the same thing, I found 3 mallard duck eggs and saved them from being washed up by the tide. I incubated them for 22 days with a heat pad. They are now in a brooder with a red lamp. All 3 hatched : 2 girld and a boy, i am going to keep them as pets as we already have 4 pet chickens. I am concernd if the male bred with one of his sisters and if this would be ok. I would love more duckies! thnx [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  10. chickens<3Mallards

    chickens<3Mallards Hatching

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    i read it was ok if they bred once ,but if their babies bred with each other when older it wouldnt be good.[​IMG]:weee:weee
     

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