Is she okay?

Jenessa_096

Crowing
Jul 14, 2021
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Molalla, Oregon
This is a Lucky my seven month old Bantam Cochin, and she start laying about two weeks ago. Today when I let them out I noticed she was not acting like herself, she had no appetite and her comb was pale. Then she pooped a very liquid stool. She just layed an egg yesterday. Am I overreacting? Or is something wrong?
 

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Ebony Rose

Crowing
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May 26, 2009
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David, Chiriquí, Panama
Looking at the weather for your area, it the temperatures are mild and pleasant but rainy lately. If I had to take a guess, I'd think cocci overload. Rain tends to bring the eggs and parasites to the surface, where it's easily digested by your flock. Cocci is/are a one-celled parasite found in one sub-species or another in every square inch of soil on the planet and preys on young, old or birds that are 'at risk' due to hidden illness or disease. Some varieties of cocci cause bloody stool, others do not. The treatment is amprolium (generic name), use the 'outbreak' dosage listed on the packaging and offer it in ALL water sources that your flock has access to. The medication works by imitating the B-vitamins that the parasite uses as food, so do not offer B-vitamin supplementation while you're treating your flock but DO offer it after the full course of treatment. There is no other down-side to treatment, and cannot harm your flock or their eggs in any way, shape, or form.
Cannot say with certainty that this is the problem, but with your weather conditions, this is where I'd start because even if she has a more serious issue, the parasite is opportunistic and could place her in an 'at risk' category. Treatment for coccidiosis first, will enable you to determine if there is more going on with her and give any further treatments for other illness (if found) a head-start by reducing her load of cocci.

Other internal parasites may also be at play, some visible to the naked eye, some not. A vet will likely be glad to do a fecal float test for a variety of worms.

Keep us posted, please.
 

Jenessa_096

Crowing
Jul 14, 2021
1,107
2,104
266
Molalla, Oregon
Looking at the weather for your area, it the temperatures are mild and pleasant but rainy lately. If I had to take a guess, I'd think cocci overload. Rain tends to bring the eggs and parasites to the surface, where it's easily digested by your flock. Cocci is/are a one-celled parasite found in one sub-species or another in every square inch of soil on the planet and preys on young, old or birds that are 'at risk' due to hidden illness or disease. Some varieties of cocci cause bloody stool, others do not. The treatment is amprolium (generic name), use the 'outbreak' dosage listed on the packaging and offer it in ALL water sources that your flock has access to. The medication works by imitating the B-vitamins that the parasite uses as food, so do not offer B-vitamin supplementation while you're treating your flock but DO offer it after the full course of treatment. There is no other down-side to treatment, and cannot harm your flock or their eggs in any way, shape, or form.
Cannot say with certainty that this is the problem, but with your weather conditions, this is where I'd start because even if she has a more serious issue, the parasite is opportunistic and could place her in an 'at risk' category. Treatment for coccidiosis first, will enable you to determine if there is more going on with her and give any further treatments for other illness (if found) a head-start by reducing her load of cocci.

Other internal parasites may also be at play, some visible to the naked eye, some not. A vet will likely be glad to do a fecal float test for a variety of worms.

Keep us posted, please.
I have been seeing some bloody stool in the coop lately. Nothing too horrible but I assumed it was normal. 🤷🏼‍♀️
 

Eggcessive

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You could go ahead and treat with Corid in the water just in case. Dosage is 2 tsp of the liquid Corid, or 1.5 tsp of the powder per gallon of water for 5-7 days. Usually grown hens have built up some tolerance of coccidia in the soil and poop, unless they have poor immunity or are in poor health.

Check her crop now (tell us what it feels like,) and again in the early morning to make sure that her crop is emptying overnight. If you have some electrolytes or can give her water with a 1/2 tsp of sugar now, and get her drinking that would be good. Reproductive disorders can sometimes cause illness. Can you check inside her vent with one finger about 2 inches, to check for a stuck egg. Look around to see if there are any broken, soft shell, or parts of an egg lying around.
 

Eggcessive

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Yes, they can still lay eggs with parasites. You may not ever see worms in her poop. The worm eggs are only seen with a microscope, if your vet can do a fecal float. Hopefully, she is going to lay.
 

Jenessa_096

Crowing
Jul 14, 2021
1,107
2,104
266
Molalla, Oregon
Yes, they can still lay eggs with parasites. You may not ever see worms in her poop. The worm eggs are only seen with a microscope, if your vet can do a fecal float. Hopefully, she is going to lay.
Still in the nesting box! 👍🏻
 

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