Is this a good way to deep litter for this coop?

Cryss

Crossing the Road
Nov 12, 2017
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Now that the entire coop is enclosed and has a a linoleum floor in the downstairs I would like to try the deep litter method. The "upstairs" is my first concern as it isn't big enough to allow for the litter to eventually accumulate to the 1ft of litter most instructions say will happen. The floor is a removable metal tray except for the nesting area which is at the same level as that floor. I only use pine shavings in all sections of the coop. I installed a roost bar above the original bars since the originals are only about 4 inches above the metal floor.
So, my thinking is I'll start deep littering in the "downstairs" portion. The "upstairs" I'll pick out debris daily and when it becomes necessary I'll slide that metal floor out allowing the soiled litter to fall downstairs. Then replace the pine shavings upstairs and toss in fresh shavings on top of existing shavings downstairs. The door downstairs that is now their "pop door" may need to be cleared of litter somehow occasionally as it gets deeper. I can't use a kickboard to keep it in because Roopecca cant climb over it. I try to keep things easy for him because he has issues with things like roosting on a bar (he doesnt) and traversing ramps (it takes him half the day to get up the courage to come down the ramp to the downstairs just so he can go outside). I'm assuming this article is correct in its instrutions.
https://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/deep-litter-method-zb0z1208zmat
Here's my coop. Any advice?
20180928_133007.jpg
 

oldhenlikesdogs

Suffering Succotash
BYC Staff
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Jul 16, 2015
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Generally deep litter needs ground contact. It's basically composting waste in place. I don't think you want to do that in your coop as it's too small. I would do deep bedding, which I do in winter where I add as necessary and also use hay in winter to thicken up the bedding. I clean as necessary but never the whole coop at one time.

If you are where it gets frozen you wouldn't actually have anything going on in a deep litter system until the spring.
 

Cryss

Crossing the Road
Nov 12, 2017
4,321
10,853
757
Northwest New Jersey
Generally deep litter needs ground contact. It's basically composting waste in place. I don't think you want to do that in your coop as it's too small. I would do deep bedding, which I do in winter where I add as necessary and also use hay in winter to thicken up the bedding. I clean as necessary but never the whole coop at one time.

If you are where it gets frozen you wouldn't actually have anything going on in a deep litter system until the spring.
This is probably a stupid question but would it help if I tossed a few shovels full of dirt inside first?
 

oldhenlikesdogs

Suffering Succotash
BYC Staff
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Jul 16, 2015
44,882
78,511
1,452
Wisconsin
Not once stuff freezes. Do you ever compost? Composting needs certain conditions to work. It all stops after temperatures fall below freezing. So does deep litter.

Deep litter in a run is different than deep litter in a shed. You can certainly try stuff, but I don't think you will get what you are thinking you will get, and your coop isn't big enough. Come spring here the deep litter in part of my shed starts to give off a strong ammonia smell. You either need to keep adding or clean out yearly. It really is a system for outside or for a bigger area, but that's just my experiences.
 

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