is this a prolapsed vent?

nickie

Songster
8 Years
Jun 25, 2011
1,118
30
143
north central KY
I'm assuming it is, but of all the pics I've ever seen, this down not look like that.


Ok, I'm having issue posting the pic. I'm working on it.

My treatment plan:
Clean area with warm water, lube it up and ease it back in.

I do not have prep h, but do have honey, but don't know what to do with the honey. Any suggestions?
 

Kevin565

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Dec 22, 2009
43,520
702
486
I believe you place the honey on the infected area to help "shrink" it in.
 

TheWaddler

Chirping
9 Years
Sep 5, 2010
120
2
91
Austin, TX
I have used Aquaphor (spelling may be a little off, pretty sure you get it in the womens makeup section at the grocery/pharmacy) with great success, its a water based jelly like vaseline but not petroleum based. We used honey and it did alright but was a sticky mess, this stuff goes away on its own without all the mess. I never wanted to use vaseline because we were going to be putting the stuff inside her and didn't want a petroleum product in my bird. Use what you have on hand to start and if it works then that's great, can always go get something else at a later time.

This can be a little disgusting, I had a leghorn that had prolapsed pretty badly and it took alot of work to get her back into shape. If it were to happen to another bird as bad as it happened to her I would probably cull in the future but I had to learn first, always have to learn. So what we did was bring her inside and put her in the sink (if you have a bucket to use that is large enough would recommend this, didn't have one large enough at the time but do now) and clean up her backside and trim feathers out of the way because her case was pretty severe and they kept getting stuck in the mess. Then, while wearing latex gloves, we very gently pushed her backside back in. Forgot to mention before we started we dipped our fingers in aquaphor because the part of her that was sticking out had dried out while we were at work so we coated everything up and then shoved it back inside her. After several attempts we got it all to stay inside her and then we again liberally coated everything with the aquaphor once again. We kept her separated from the other birds because they don't make the best healing buddies and repeated the process a few times and she recovered, quite fine as far as I can tell. She is once again giving me an egg every day with no signs of stress or any blood on the eggs.

Like I had said, it can be a little disgusting....you will become more intimate with the inner workings of that one bird probably more than you ever thought you might but it is a great learning experience in my opinion and I think everyone should do at least one so they become familiar with what is exactly going on with their flock and how to deal with it should the problem ever arise again....and it will. Hope this helps, got a little long winded there but there ya go.
 

nickie

Songster
8 Years
Jun 25, 2011
1,118
30
143
north central KY
Thanks for the hand Kevin565, much appreciated.

So, that's what a prolapse looks like without the blood? Seen lots of bloody ones in pictures, but never one like this.
 

Kevin565

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Dec 22, 2009
43,520
702
486
It's no problem. I know the new system is a little tricky right now.

Here's a photo without blood. (Sorry it's not a very good one)

 

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