Is this Coccidiosis?

azygous

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Only an X-ray can tell us what's going on inside your hen. Something that is undigestible like styrofoam could be moving slowly through her system, and depending on where it is in the tract, it could cause different problems. In the intestines, it can interfere with absorption of calories and nutrients, causing starvation as indicated by green poop. Lower in the tract, it could block the oviduct and cause an egg to get stuck.

A stuck egg would be a crisis that requires immediate treatment with calcium, so do that first. I give my hens one tablet of this.
F57D4B6B-216D-49EC-A92C-3DFAF3C5915E.jpeg
This helps contractions so an egg may pass more easily. I suggest installing this hen in a crate or box with towels under her so you can observe all that comes out of her. Hopefully, some styrofoam will appear along with an egg.

If she lays an egg and perks up, goes back to normal, then further action would not be necessary. But if she worsens, and there's a heavy watery discharge but no egg, then calcium should be continued with the assumption an egg is stuck or there's a blockage in the gizzard, and a flush might help.
 

Wyorp Rock

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Her eggs are normal. Meaning nothing weird about them, and I’m not sure if laying an egg made her feel better, but I will keep and eye out for an egg and let you know. I’m going to check in on her in a little bit.

Is she had reproductive issues, wouldn’t she have been like this a long time ago? I’m new to reproductive issues, that’s why I’m asking.
Do keep track of it and see if she's lays an egg and starts improving.

She's only 7 1/2 months old, how long has she been laying eggs?
Reproductive issues can show up at any age.
 
Nov 3, 2021
386
949
158
Spring Lake, NC
Only an X-ray can tell us what's going on inside your hen. Something that is undigestible like styrofoam could be moving slowly through her system, and depending on where it is in the tract, it could cause different problems. In the intestines, it can interfere with absorption of calories and nutrients, causing starvation as indicated by green poop. Lower in the tract, it could block the oviduct and cause an egg to get stuck.

A stuck egg would be a crisis that requires immediate treatment with calcium, so do that first. I give my hens one tablet of this. View attachment 2907886 This helps contractions so an egg may pass more easily. I suggest installing this hen in a crate or box with towels under her so you can observe all that comes out of her. Hopefully, some styrofoam will appear along with an egg.

If she lays an egg and perks up, goes back to normal, then further action would not be necessary. But if she worsens, and there's a heavy watery discharge but no egg, then calcium should be continued with the assumption an egg is stuck or there's a blockage in the gizzard, and a flush might help.
I have to crush up the tablet, right? Can I use normal calcium, instead of calcium citrate d3?
 
Nov 3, 2021
386
949
158
Spring Lake, NC
Do keep track of it and see if she's lays an egg and starts improving.

She's only 7 1/2 months old, how long has she been laying eggs?
Reproductive issues can show up at any age.
She’s been laying eggs for about 1 month or a bit more. I just tried the method you suggested, the one between the legs. It felt somewhat squishy and in some spots a little stiffer, but I think that’s just the bone. Is this normal?
 

azygous

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You do NOT need to crush a pill to give to a chicken. They will swallow it whole without any problem. Do it and watch it disappear without you needing to do CPR.

There are three different forms of calcium - carbonate, gluconate, and citrate. Calcium citrate is the easiest of the three forms to digest, therefore works the fastest, which is advantageous when a hen is facing a reproductive crisis that has the potential to kill her if it is not resolved within a reasonable length of time. The D-3 further helps absorption into the bloodstream and tissues, which makes it even better than plain calcium carbonate, which is what Tums is and what oyster shell is.
 
Nov 3, 2021
386
949
158
Spring Lake, NC
You do NOT need to crush a pill to give to a chicken. They will swallow it whole without any problem. Do it and watch it disappear without you needing to do CPR.

There are three different forms of calcium - carbonate, gluconate, and citrate. Calcium citrate is the easiest of the three forms to digest, therefore works the fastest, which is advantageous when a hen is facing a reproductive crisis that has the potential to kill her if it is not resolved within a reasonable length of time. The D-3 further helps absorption into the bloodstream and tissues, which makes it even better than plain calcium carbonate, which is what Tums is and what oyster shell is.
Oh, alright, thanks for this. I’ve let her out to free range, is that a good idea?
 
Nov 3, 2021
386
949
158
Spring Lake, NC
You do NOT need to crush a pill to give to a chicken. They will swallow it whole without any problem. Do it and watch it disappear without you needing to do CPR.

There are three different forms of calcium - carbonate, gluconate, and citrate. Calcium citrate is the easiest of the three forms to digest, therefore works the fastest, which is advantageous when a hen is facing a reproductive crisis that has the potential to kill her if it is not resolved within a reasonable length of time. The D-3 further helps absorption into the bloodstream and tissues, which makes it even better than plain calcium carbonate, which is what Tums is and what oyster shell is.
I have given her a calcium pill, but she would not eat it, and I can’t put it in her beak, she won’t let me, so I have put it in her water in the hopes that she will drink the water and get better. Was this a good idea?
 

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