Is this impacted crop? What to do?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Ondra's Seramas, May 23, 2011.

  1. It isn't.

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  2. It is-leave her be.

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  3. It is-treat with warm water.

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  4. It is-treat with immediate surgery.

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  5. It is-treat with other (please specify)

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  6. It is- put her down (please explain)

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  1. Ondra's Seramas

    Ondra's Seramas Drowning in Seramas

    Feb 19, 2009
    North Central WA
    One of my friends called me about a sick hen of hers. The symptoms are:
    Not moving/standing
    Very large, very hard crop
    Very thin
    Purplish skin
    Not eating or drinking

    I read somewhere that an impacted crop can restrict breathing, causing a lack of oxygen and skin discoloration. Is this true? It sounds like impacted crop to me, but I don't have much experience with it. If it is, then I can go over there to treat it (they don't want to). I kind of need to know quickly. If it is, would I have to go to the extreme of cutting the impaction out?

    This is a young hen, about a year old. I think she is Old English/EE mix. I don't know her exact housing conditions.


    ETA: Sorry, I didn't mean to do a poll. I wasn't sure how to get rid of it and didn't want a blank poll. Maybe it will be useful, but please comment as well. Thank you.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2011
  2. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Holts Summit, Missouri
    I just when through a bout with impacted crop. Action ideally before major weight loss. Bird is dehydrated and low on energy at very least and breakdown of crop contents may be somewhat toxic. Massaging out works with smaller impaction but if you have to do lots, very stressfull. Since she can no longer walk, it is unlikely corrective actions will work.

    You could cut open crop with very sharp knife / scapel and gently flush contents out with warm water from squirt bottle. Then close wound with super glue. An additional 18 hours required before feeding could be resumed. Ideally first feedings would be liquid with purpose of maintaining energy and salts.
     
  3. Ondra's Seramas

    Ondra's Seramas Drowning in Seramas

    Feb 19, 2009
    North Central WA
    So just normal superglue? It won't hurt her? It will stay? As she was described, I'm not sure she could live another 18 hours without eating. If she can't eat if I do this for 18 hours, could I try a tiny stomach tube?
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Developement of super glue was for rapid closure of wounds. The cutting hurts but chickens seem very pain tolerant. Will likely bother you more as surgen.

    The issue concerning 18 hours is why may be too late. Stomach tube might work if you know how to do it. The impaction itself may make stomach tube difficult to use. Getting fluids, sugar and salts into digestive tract should remote in almost immediate improvement unless septic nature of impaction poisoning bird.
     
  5. Ondra's Seramas

    Ondra's Seramas Drowning in Seramas

    Feb 19, 2009
    North Central WA
    Alright, thanks for the superglue tip. As for the stomach tube, I have experience using them on lambs and sheep, but not chickens. Is it done in the same way? What would I use for a tube? Would a lamb tube work?

    Thanks so much!
     
  6. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I am weak on use of stomach tubes. I use them on fish mostly although have used aquarium hose for dominique rooster to get food into crop. Getting stomach tube to exit crop and enter stomach will be a challenge. Again, material in crop will obstruct.
     
  7. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    I use a red rubber catheter, they have a flare on the end that you can attach a feeding syringe into. You may be able to get one from your vet. They are soft, but firm enough to pass without kinking. Best size is a 12 french for adult birds. Use a 60cc catheter-tip syringe for the food or liquid. The tube passes easily into the esophagus if you insert it gently through the beak with the bird sitting upright. It is really helpful to have the bird wrapped lightly in a towel with someone else holding it until you get the hang of it. Always give a little plain water first, if the tube does happen to go onto the trachea you wil know right away, and a small amount of water will not hurt the bird.
     
  8. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:How do you get past impaction in crop? Or is it needed to be bypassed?
     
  9. 1muttsfan

    1muttsfan Overrun With Chickens

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    You can try softening it with warm water, but if is really hardened up surgery may be the only chance, and if she is in bad shape it will be hard (but not impossible) for her to survive that. Water (and electrolyte solution) should be able to go through or around the obstruction if you give it slowly through the tube. Electrolytes may help strengthen her, and fluids would also help since they would resolve dehydration. It may be possible to soften the obstruction enough to break it down. Be careful when passing the tube, if you are too firm you could puncture the esophagus. The tube should slide easily. You may want to hold it along her neck and mark the length from mouth to crop on the tube so that you know how far to pass it. I would not try to force a tube past an obstruction.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2011
  10. Ondra's Seramas

    Ondra's Seramas Drowning in Seramas

    Feb 19, 2009
    North Central WA
    I didn't get there in time. She died.
     

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